AWS, Azure, Google Cloud: Which Will Pay You the Most?

For many technologists, knowledge of major cloud platforms such as Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud is an absolute must. But can specializing in these platforms translate into high salaries?

That’s a question answered in Stack Overflow’s latest Developer Survey, which queried specialists in the world’s largest cloud platforms about their median salaries. Here’s how 32,695 of them answered:

As you might expect given its ubiquity, AWS pays the most, followed by Azure and Google. While salaries can vary wildly depending on your experience, skills, company, and specialization, the chart suggests those technologists who opted to focus on either IBM or Oracle clouds are at something of a disadvantage when it comes to pay. (Another Stack Overflow chart showed that Oracle and IBM are way behind Microsoft, Amazon, and Google when it comes to cloud usage, so perhaps these lower salaries reflect a relative lack of demand.)  

If you’re interested in learning how to use the major cloud platforms, there are lots of classes out there (both online and in-person) that can teach you the fundamentals. If you’re an autodidact, there’s also a substantial amount of documentation online. For example, Microsoft offers documentation, plus lessons on everything from Azure SQL fundamentals to managing cloud resources; AWS likewise has lots of documentation, along with forums where you can ask questions about the platform’s tools and quibbles. Google Cloud also has documentation, including a handy Getting Started guide. 

When it comes to the cloud, every company’s needs evolve over time; even if you’ve mastered one (or more) of the big cloud platforms, you’ll likely need to acquire new knowledge and skills throughout the years. With digital transformation at the forefront of many corporate roadmaps, there’s no better time to learn as much about the intricacies of the cloud as you can. 

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