H-1B Visa Program: Top U.S. States for Applications

Have you ever wondered which states feature the heaviest H-1B visa use (by companies within their borders)? It may not shock you to find California, Texas, and New Jersey are the heaviest users.

To figure out the states with the heaviest H-1B use, we parsed this huge U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) dataset. One way to do this is by top five zip codes; Texas took the top two spots, followed closely by Mountain View, California, then Rockville, MD, then Chicago in fifth.

College Station and Richardson, Texas, make up half of Texas’s H-1B applications; those two cities landed roughly 30,000 applicants of the total 63,000 in Texas. In California, companies relying on the visa tend to be more spread out; Mountain View lead the way with just over 9,000 applicants (while Santa Clara added another 5,000), but those were just a fraction of the overall 76,000 applications in the state between October 1, 2018 and March 31, 2019. (Many of these applications are for staffing and contracting firms that then send H-1B workers to tech companies; for a breakdown of enterprise firms such as IBM subcontracting their H-1B workers, check out this breakdown from the same dataset.)

When you break down H-1B applications purely by state (as opposed to zip code), things change a little bit; for example, California leads, followed by Texas, New Jersey, New York, and Illinois. The chart below shows which states are using H-1B most – and least. All states are ranked; just click through the little button at the top to cycle through the full listing.

California isn’t the only state with a geographically wide spread of H-1B visa applications. Many other states have a similar pattern of usage: For example, Massachusetts, Michigan, Washington, and Virginia all rank within the top ten states using H-1B… but none have metropolitan areas in that top-ten list of zip codes, suggesting that the companies applying for H-1B workers aren’t very concentrated.

On the lower side of this list, it’s interesting that Guam has more H-1B visa applications (180) than South Dakota (129), Wyoming (114), Alaska (77), or Montana (61). (A special shoutout to Palau with its one unique applicant, too.)

We also know the H-1B is used most often for ‘Software Engineer’ and ‘Software Developer’ roles. If we were to create a Venn diagram of who is most at-risk of having their career or industry disrupted by H-1B visa recipients, it’s software developers and engineers in Silicon Valley.

76 Responses to “H-1B Visa Program: Top U.S. States for Applications”

    • rick_definitely_sucks

      each H1-B qualified applicant means they looked for american workers and could not find someone who has the skillsets. That process is called LCA which is needed before filing for the application. I think the focus should be to educate / train american workforce so that they are qualified for those jobs and we don’t need to have dependency on foreign workers. Shutting H-1b creates a void that american workforce can’t fill at this time. That will create challenge for american companies and will cause them lose their advantage on the global stage

        • Impacted Person

          Yes. Companies put lot of criteria in the Requirement to filter the American candidates and manipulate in getting the overseas applicant / student. When the approved H1-B starts to work he would hardly use 50% of the skills mentioned in the Req. This is crafted by the Law firms who assist in the process. Also many of the new recruits will be kept on benching and published or e-mail circulated to client companies checking for project engagement. So the need of 65,000 is highly inflated and gradually displace the American workforce.

      • They’ve destroyed the industry and anyone who was around for the transition in the early 2000s can tell you right when it started to happen. It’s terrible and it will stop. They’ve been found out and we all know what’s happening now, which means congress will have to follow soon because WE the PEOPLE will fix this.

  1. H-1B is good for the economy. Just think about it in unbiased way. They create more jobs than they take. Pay more taxes. Almost zero crime rate among them. And, they work hard. If we close H-1B, some other country will benefit. If you still don’t believe me, look at the record low unemployment rate, high wages despite H-1B, and count the number of Fortune 500 companies in this country in the last 50 years.

    • Such garbage rhetoric! “they create more jobs than it they take” This is yet another P.R. professional that works for the cheap labor lobby.
      One main reason so many millenials are not finding jobs out of college is the the ripple effect that H1B, OPT, EB etc have on the U.S. economy It propagates throughout other industries that arent originally involved.
      Millennials are conditioned to not speak up about the negative impact that import labor causes for their job market. If they do they call eachother racist for even talking about it.

        • The better measure is of the participation rate. Data from the Census Bureau confirmed that a stunning 3 in 4 Americans with a STEM degree do not hold a job in a STEM field—that’s a pool of more than 11 million Americans with STEM qualifications who lack STEM employment[1]. This is a constantly growing number: Rutgers Professor Hal Salzman, a top national expert on STEM labor markets, estimates that “U.S. colleges produce twice the number of STEM graduates annually as find jobs in those fields.”[2]

          Specifically, of those who majored in Computers, Mathematics and Statistics (1,959,730), 50.81% did not hold a job in a STEM field (i.e., Computer Workers, Mathematicians and Statisticians, Engineers, Life scientists, Physical Scientists, and Social Scientists).

          Of those who majored in Engineering (3,340,430), 50.54% did not hold a job in a STEM field.

          There is, in fact, a glut of US citizen/permanent resident STEM workers.

          [1] “Census Bureau Reports Majority of STEM College Graduates Do Not Work in STEM Occupations”, Release Number: CB14-130, July 10, 2014, US Census Bureau

          [2] “STEM Grads Are at a Loss”, September 15, 2014, U.S. News

    • Narender

      Let me shot back with a logical explanation to the above gentleman (Dan): 1. All Employees without exception pay the taxes NOT just H1B folks. there is no special favor by H1 people(No argument there). 2.H1 B is NOT good for American Citizens and it is like stealing somebody food. 3. All these years H1B Program was ABUSED left and right by Consulting companies and imported skill-less people for a price. (Enough is Enough). That is why the ask is”Merit based” hiring and Visa issuance. I am not against anybody here, just making a sensible point and stop being merciful in front of US Citizens. We are being looked after like “Beggars”. Guys lets find alternate options and keep up your heads-up with pride.

    • You must either be on h1b or a staffing company making millions. Everyone knows these ppl get 30/hr and they send all the money back home. They live in small apartment to maximize savings that are finally taken back to India

  2. Nate, Finally you start to get it…”most at-risk of having their career or industry disrupted by H-1B visa recipients, it’s software developers and engineers in Silicon Valley.” Now how about writing about the abuses and American citizen’s lives destroyed, instead of the usual “we have a developer shortage “ or about how s336/h1044 bills will flood us with more h1-b’s

  3. There are many shady Indian consultancies abusing H1B in Richardson, Texas (Dallas area). I know many students personally who graduated and went there just to join shady consultancies. ICE should do something real fast to shut off these leeches.

  4. If anyone can prove me that H1Bs were preferred over native Americans I wouldn’t believe you. Are you trying to say Americans aren’t competitive enough to compete against H1Bs? I don’t see any jobs doing discrimination that they prefer H1Bs over citizens. When there is game of pure hard work and competition and if some people are not capable enough to compete and crying over extra hard work of H1Bs then you are painting a completely different picture

    • the underpayment of H-1B workers is well-established fact, not rumor, anecdote or ideology. It has been confirmed by two congressionally-commissioned reports, and a number of academic studies, in both statistical and qualitative analyses.

      An employer survey conducted by the GAO[1] found that some employers readily admitted to paying H-1Bs less than comparable Americans, but noted that they were nevertheless paying the legally required wage (i.e., the “prevailing wage”), thereby illustrating that the latter is indeed below the market wage.

      The GAO found that, “some employers said that they hired H-1B workers in part because these workers would often accept lower salaries than similarly qualified U.S. workers; however, these employers said they never paid H-1B workers less than the required wage.”

      This jibes with a previous employer survey[2], commissioned by Congress, that found, “…H-1B workers in jobs requiring lower levels of IT skill received lower wages, less senior job titles, smaller signing bonuses, and smaller pay and compensation increases than would be typical for the work they actually did.”

      So two employer surveys, one by the government and the other commissioned by the government, had employers actually admitting to underpaying their H-1Bs. And the GAO shows that the employers admit that the prevailing wage, the legal wage floor for H-1Bs, is a joke. The data in the paper shows the underpayment statistically as well.

      References:

      [1] H-1B Foreign Workers: Better Tracking Needed to Help Determine H-1B Program’s Effects on U.S. Workforce
      GAO-03-883, US General Accounting Office, Sept. 2003

      [2] Building a Workforce for the Information Economy.
      National Research Council. 2001

  5. Now a days if you go to an IT org of any corp (big/medium), you will notice that over 90% are Indian from top till bottom. i request this Indian management to please also hire others outside their Indian friends and family members. i am also noticing some strange hiring practices by these Indian management. for example: while interviewing in US for candidates, sometime they ask their India based team to conduct interview and tell the candidate in advance. in another example you will notice that the higher manager of US based team is permanently sitting & working from India.

  6. H1BCandidate

    I am on H1B visa and I completely understand the sentiments of every person here who is against H-1B program. Here is my take on that – This program is supposed to be good for US economy but the way it is being abused is harming many Americans. There is a huge demand of software engineering roles throughout the country and if we remove each and every H1B candidate from the USA, companies won’t be able to fill even half of their positions. I am not blaming anybody here. From my personal experience, what I have observed in this country is that pursuing degrees in computer science courses is not as popular as it is in countries such as China and India from where most of the H1B seats gets filled each year because of which alone American citizen graduates won’t be able to meet the demand of growing technology industry here and its nobody’s blame. So H1B is basically is solving this problem.

    The problem lies where H1b starts getting abused. There are a plethora of consultancies that hire young graduates and place them on the client’s site as a very experienced professional by facking their resumes and interviews etc. This type of body shop model has been increasing and is ruining the reputation of the H1B program and the candidates who genuinely deserve to continue working in the stated on H1B.

    As per my understanding, USCIS should take strict measure to scrutinize cases vendor-client model cases and decline visas of candidates in this model. This alone will improve the situation a lot.

    • It’s not just the body shops that are abusing the H-1B visa.

      The wage rules for H-1B and green card sponsorship are broken down into wage Levels I, II, III and IV, with Level III being the median. For software developers, the most common type of foreign worker on H-1B, the green card data show the following percentages of foreign workers at Levels I or II making below-median wages: Amazon 91%; Facebook 91%; and Google 96%. These firms, putatively in the vanguard of advanced technology and certainly in the vanguard in Capitol Hill lobbying regarding H-1B, are paying almost all of their foreign workers – supposedly, the “best and brightest” – wages below the median for the given region. This belies the industry lobbyists’ claims that H-1B workers are hired because they’re experts that can’t be found among the U.S. workforce, and it certainly illustrates that not only the body shops abuse the H-1B visa.

  7. I have never heard that rather there is a huge discrimination recruiters say we prefer citizens , why would anyone want to go hassle of processing h1b transfer when it’s so easy to hire citizens . Lol you make no sense. You need to ask H1Bs how much harassment they are going through due to recruiters just rejecting then since they are on h1b

  8. H1B program is one of the most gawd awful things that the U.S. ever came up with. Every year the cap is filled and every 3 years many reapply. Those numbers are for one year and now multiply that for every year and you will have a count of how many jobs are leaving to this program. Do the math and keep voting for Democrats and keep the American worker out of a job.

    • Before running for president, Ted Cruz advocated for a 500% increase in the annual H-1B visa cap. Marco Rubio co-sponsored a bill called I-Squared which would do worse things than the H-1B visa has. Jeb Bush supports the H-1B visa. Mike Bloomberg calls for unlimited H-1B visas.

      Don’t kid yourself that this is solely a Democratic thing. Selling out American workers is a bi-partisan effort.

  9. Indian Guy

    Believe me , its modern slavery , I am planning to go back to India . fkuc H1 .
    Rather be with family and and build product and compete in android store / apple store or work on some open source project .
    why beg , if you loose a job you need to leave in 30 days , who has a such a stress . kids need to be displaced and family .
    More over dependents cannot work (not all) and kids need to self deport after 18 years of age . why fkuc would you want to spoil your health and pressure of loosing job and work . most managers discriminate if you are on H1. 99% of the time reciters say H1 ?! sorry we cannot Sponsor , if this is not called discrimination then what else ?. Intelligent Indians should start companies back home and compete or go to UK , NewZland , Australia /Germany .. American dream is over they are saturated.

  10. John Watson

    Too may Americans are losing jobs (especially in tech industry) to H1-B / H4 visa holders from India because the Indian outsourcing bodyshops like Wipro, Infosys, TCS, Cognizant, HCL, etc. have monopolized the broken H1-B lottery system. We need to shut down H1-B visa program and convert our legal immigration to merit based system rather than lottery system.

    • Beware “Merit Based System” sounds legit but its just more word games that people like Lindsey Graham are going to use to justify current standards SB 1044. In otherwords, they will “adjust” the threshold levels of merit to conveniently meet company demands. The end result is nothing will change but politicians and the companies they work for can say they made changes.

    • I am getting so-o-o-o sick of fielding phone calls from Indian boiler room recruiting shops that, after they get through the scripted “How are you?” greeting, begin their spiel: “I am calling you about a full-time position in . How much are you looking for in a salary.” No email regarding the position so I can follow along and ask intelligent questions about the requirements. Just Bam! “What is your salary requirement?” And when I can get a word in edge-wise, it turns out that this is NOT a full-time position with a business in . It’s a full-time position with Cognizant (occasionally other Indian body shops but most often it’s Cognizant). I tell them to call back when they have a full-time position with a company actually based in and not some short term project where, when that project is over, I’ll have to live out of a suitcase for the next short-term project, probably in Muddy Shoe, Idaho. No thanks. Screw these companies; they’re a large part of the reason we can’t have full-time jobs in the U.S. any more… just “gigs”.

  11. There are more open positions than the number of people looking for jobs. Most americans who are fairly good with tech get high paying jobs. I personally tried to hire for few open positions and for 3 months no american applied for the job. I had to fill the position with a H1B. Some of these people above has absolutely no idea what they are talking about.

    • Data trumps anecdotes masquerading as facts. Logic trumps cute little sound bites.

      Data from the Census Bureau confirmed that a stunning 3 in 4 Americans with a STEM degree do not hold a job in a STEM field—that’s a pool of more than 11 million Americans with STEM qualifications who lack STEM employment[1]. This is a constantly growing number: Rutgers Professor Hal Salzman, a top national expert on STEM labor markets, estimates that “U.S. colleges produce twice the number of STEM graduates annually as find jobs in those fields.”[2] There is, in fact, a glut of STEM trained workers.

      And it seems you refuse to concede that the US government offers a financial incentive to employers to hire a foreign national over a US citizen via the OPT program. Your arguments are intellectually dishonest.

      [1] “Census Bureau Reports Majority of STEM College Graduates Do Not Work in STEM Occupations”, Release Number: CB14-130, July 10, 2014, US Census Bureau

      [2] “STEM Grads Are at a Loss”, September 15, 2014, U.S. News

    • Q: How many bullet-pointed requirements are you including in the job descriptions?

      Just because the person that left that position used 27 different technologies during their tenure doesn’t mean a new hire needs those on Day 1. If job candidates have to scroll through a laundry list of “requirements”, that’s almost certainly too many to be real requirements. Applicants know that companies continue to look for Purple Squirrels and know that the company ATS will likely toss any resumes that don’t list each and every “required” technology. It’s no wonder that number of applicants is low.

      I’ve sat through interviews where a hiring manager read through a couple of pages long checklist of “required” technologies and checked off which ones I did and didn’t have. It would have been easier — and a damned sight quicker — if I’d asked for the clipboard and checked things off for him.

  12. Concerned Citizen

    I was recently passed over for a full-time programming position at a US policy research firm that relies entirely on US state and federal contracts. This was a masters/Phd level data-science position. I consistently outperformed two non-citizen candidates, yet when offers were released, they were hired over me.

    This company explicitly states that they do not sponsor visas. The loophole they’ve found is that companies don’t have to ‘sponsor’ H1-B visas for Masters+ candidates; they simply write a letter confirming that the person is employed, and they are eligible for 12-18 months of OPT (optional practical training, AKA paid work) in the US after graduation.

    So what happened to me? This company used the fact that they could offer OPT extensions to pay a lower hourly rate to people with the same qualifications (at least on paper, these two were incompetent). To hire me, a citizen, would have cost a few more bucks per hour. They chose the cheaper workers.

    It occurred to me that I will be fighting this battle against lower-paid foreign workers my entire career. This would be fine if it were truly a meritocracy (best worker wins the position). Unfortunately, that is not the case. Companies can get away with paying less to foreign workers by leveraging their ability to offer a life in the US. A non-trivial proportion of these H1-B’s and OPT’s are converted to green cards within several years.

    The effects of this, on a personal level, are devastating. There is absolutely no protection for highly educated, talented US workers under the current regime. This is my experience working at a company based in the US that makes US policy recommendations with US federal/state contract money. They found me, a domestic worker capable of exceeding their expectations for the position, yet passed that by in order to pay a foreign OPT worker $5 less.

    This is not a matter of one group working harder than the other. Meritocracy is dead. Nepotism, tribal group preference, and financial incentives for companies to exploit the current immigration system will continue to cause a race to the bottom.

    • Sorry to break your bubble, but you sound like an ignorant brat. You don’t even know how the other two did in their interviews. You think a few rejections are end of the world.

      Getting a job as a foreigner is damn hard. I was into depression, because I spent $250K from loans on the education and got rejected from every damn place.

      • FakeFaker

        Fake you Andy.! You are just ignorant and the most of the people here. You need to open your eyes and start realizing the facts. Work hard or start a company and only recruit the ones you think should work here.

  13. Half of the people here are too ignorant. OPT is supposed to be a benefit for foreign students who spend a heck lot of money on the US education system. Yet, it puts them into an unending and depressing struggle.

    Moreover, all foreigners go through a trauma and depression here that you all don’t even know about. Getting a job on a visa is almost next to impossible. If you somehow beat the odds, you still end up in the most ignorant immigrant system. Even the law calls you an alien.

    For those of you who think they are taking your jobs. You’re so mistaken. It would probably be impossible to change your mind. Ignorant brats think that somehow graduating with a degree is a big accomplishment, and they want to be spoon fed. The jobs for foreigners are already super restricted to 1% of the open positions out there. And, it takes a miracle and yet needs you to beat all odds to even get any sort of work.

    • Actually many companies restrict hiring to just OPT’s. I run across them again and again. The pepper my emails, begging me to apply, only to reject me days later.

      I think the OPT is only fair for grads who gave up so much to study here. But does it have to be used and abused in such a broad way? How do we break up these sweat shops?
      How do we get the best and brightest from India without the resume padders as well?

  14. Here’s an Indian on Quora:
    Quite a few of service based companies (quite small compared to that of TCS, Infosys..etc.) specially operated by people from Telugu speaking states from India will process H1B by bloating your resume with fake experience(usually 3-7 years or even more) and skills that you don’t really have. Your job then is to dutifully learn the skill they teach you in their in-house premises advertised with a ‘free accommodation’ tag . They will find a client for you to work with readily, by clearing the telephone interview on your behalf and you would appear at the client location to do the work. What do they get in return? Certainly a good billing from the client, in addition to that a split from your salary say 20- 40 % of what you are actually paid on which you both mutually agree upon priorly. Now, to process your H1B application they have to clear you from resident labour market test (called LCA in USA) and to do that, they have to prove that ‘there is no competent American/Green card holder’ to do that particular job. This will be done by releasing an ad in electronic/print media in remotely read/seen pages to see that not many will apply for that position. Even if some American did it, he/she shall be most likely refused citing ‘technical/competence’ related reasons. You can exercise this option by approaching ‘consultants in Hyderabad’ and paying them certain commission which is usually upwards of 1 lakh INR ($1600-2500 ) or get a Masters admission in ‘a random university (no matter how worse it is)’ in and around Houston,Dallas,San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago,Boston, Washington,New Jersey, Baltimore, Detroit, Miami preferably (the reason being these are the areas where most of Telugu reside besides business including those of IT run here) but not necessarily. This is the preferred route for most of the Telugu speaking so called ‘students’ in USA to get a H1B.

  15. OPT amounts to the government offering a $30,000 incentive to employers for hiring a foreign STEM student instead of a U.S. citizen or permanent resident STEM student. This bonus takes the form of the employer being exempt from paying payroll tax for their foreign student workers (due to their student status, which they technically still have under OPT in spite of having graduated). Why hire Americans, eh?

    Since this tax exemption from payroll tax was pointed out in a lawsuit against DHS, and has been one of the major points raised by critics, DHS is well aware of it. Yet they refuse to address it or even acknowledge it.

    In contrast to DHS previous statements, in which they openly admitted that they intend OPT as an end-run around the H-1B cap, they now describe OPT in warm and fuzzy terms of “mentoring”. That raises several questions:

    If the U.S. indeed “needs” the foreign students to remedy a STEM labor shortage, why do these students need training? The DHS/industry narrative is that the U.S. lacks sufficient workers with STEM training, while the foreign workers are supposedly already trained. And, if workers with such training are indeed needed, why won’t these special mentoring programs be open to Americans? Why just offer them to foreign students? Since DHS admitted that its motivation in OPT is to circumvent the H-1B cap, does that mean that if the cap were high enough to accommodate everyone, these same foreign students wouldn’t need training after all?

    But, wait. Let me guess..I’m just being an ignorant brat, right? Your sense of entitlement is astounding.

  16. May be add this to your statement as well:
    Why these student have to pay atleast 30% more fees to colleges then citizens
    Why they need to come to US and fill STEM seats which are mostly left empty by US students.
    Why come here and contribute to our economy etc etc etc.
    These people can come here, pay high fees and everything but shouldn’t do any job. Yeah pretty much trump’s great america, and dont worry mate very soon these people will also go away and so does the companies and jobs.

  17. Most of you have valid points. Students come to the US for STEM education and experience, because technology companies in the US are ahead of the world “today”. This is what attracts them here. I personally was also attracted by learning that US is a free, welcoming, and progressive place. Most of the foreign students and immigrants are highly motivated, and want to make an impact and contribute. That is what they genuinely want. In return, they don’t get much.

    The body shops that some of you are talking about are already being shut. They are not the foreign students’ or workers’ fault. That kind of abuse happens to every law out there. But, the H1B and OPT law both keep the American economy way ahead. Just think about it in this way – if you bring a lot of smart people from around the world in one place, what are they going to do? Do something awesome, right? Unfortunately, many of the dreams are crushed, because many of you will never get convinced about the hardships foreigners face.

    All I can say is as Americans, this country will always choose and reward you first. Don’t believe the rhetoric presented otherwise. If your own experience tells you otherwise, I just suggest to you that please continue to work hard. You chose STEM because you were passionate about doing something awesome. Complaining about someone else taking your job is really not going to help you in the long run. Some of the foreigners will turn out to be the best people you ever worked with. Some of them will leave because this country doesn’t see their value. As an American, you have limitless opportunities. All the best!

  18. AmericanSTEMWorker

    The problem is epidemic, in every major city in the country to the extent of being absurd in places like Seattle and the Bay Area. When you ask corporations to determine whether or not there are no US Citizens available to do the jobs, then you are asking the fox to guard the chickens. I can understand allowing a handful of super-stars to come study and work in our country. I cannot understand selling out entire departments from Director to analyst with cheap labor in every company in the country. The nepotism and racism is astonishing, the bias in interviews is obvious. If indians are so smart, they should stay home and master sanitation and running water in there OWN country.

    • AmericanSTEMWorker

      Not to mention, India is such an impoverished country due to lack of family planning. Novel idea: If you can’t afford children don’t have them! This country is socialist, corrupt, nepotistic, and has not mastered essential 20th century concepts like birth control. You would not need to travel half a world away to find work if you fixed your own country.

      • Hello_Mr_AmericanSTEMWorker

        Stop blaming a country and get a napkin to wipe your tears. Do you know an average Indian has only 2 kids and average success marriage rate is above 90%. India is not the problem here. Its your darn impatience and complain for everything factor.

        Work hard and prove your skills. No one can take your job.!

        “Instead of complaining that the rose bush is full of thorns, be happy the thorn bush has roses.”

  19. According to the Census Bureau, of those US citizens and permanent residents who majored in Computers, Mathematics and Statistics (1,959,730), 50.81% did not hold a job in a STEM field (i.e., Computer Workers, Mathematicians and Statisticians, Engineers, Life scientists, Physical Scientists, and Social Scientists)[1]. Half. In fields that supposedly have a “shortage” of workers. Apparently, either because there exists no jobs for them so they had to settle for something else, or they found employment in fields that pay more.

    [1] “Census Bureau Reports Majority of STEM College Graduates Do Not Work in STEM Occupations”, Release Number: CB14-130, July 10, 2014, US Census Bureau

  20. Jai Hindh

    After reading through most of the comments, I see a ton on complaints, rather than how to make this work or get a common grounds for all of us to succeed. Of course, one always love to live a life with no issues, and always love to find a way to comment on the others who are being smarter than the rest. Its a evolution thing, and there is no need to be sorry/worry about this. I cannot accept most of the complaints, as most (not all but most) of the H1B’s are given a legal way. We (indians particularly) work all the way up to get to reach the American Dream. Please remember that this so called “American Dream” is created here, but not by any particular national. This was an advertisement that was and is being sold to most of the immigrants. If this is so called “American Dream” is not true, with all due respect, please close the gates and stop advertising about this. This will help a lot in making things transparent, rather than causing a social discomfort and nuisance.

    Secondly, most of the STEM grads complain that they were not enough opportunities. That’s correct, because of the standards of the education. As a student you are doing what is being told, but no one are reading through the text books (from the education standards perspective). There are no adequate training or venues or in some cases, individuals are not ready to go the extra mile to learn and get succeed. Nothing wrong with this, but there will be a final result at some point that the individual will realize or complain that they are not getting a fair amount of chances.

    Last but not the least, we have to live in harmony and comfort in what we have in hand now. Your acceptance or denial has to go into the law, to make it work for what is good for the country.

  21. Alan Grimes

    I’m 41, been unemployed for the last 8 years, where are one of these jobs magically created by the presence of foreign workers? I want one! I will get in my 19 year old car TONIGHT and go to the city where they are! It’s a Honda Civic and is in pretty good shape so I think I will be able to reach just about any city in the continental US if I can afford the gas money, so please tell me where these jobs are because I would like, at the age of 41, to start a family too. I have a Bachelor’s in computer science, and should be qualified for just about any entry level programming position.