Studies Show Working Remotely Can Improve Your Work-Life Balance

The ability to work remotely is far more important to people than you might think. Two recent studies underscore how working from home (or a coffee shop, or the space of your choice) may impact how you live.

A recent GoToMeeting survey shows working remotely shapes major life decisions. Out of 3,000 respondents, 24 percent say working remotely has “influenced major life decisions,” which include things such as making major purchases or going back to school. They also cite saving money as key to their desire to work remotely.

Some 60 percent report they’d be more likely to accept a job with a strong remote working culture, while 28 percent of respondents say working remotely would be worth a pay cut. Around 41 percent say working remotely is “very important” to the future of business, and 40 percent say their lives would be worse if they couldn’t work from home.

GoToMeeting’s survey also shows that, for respondents aged 25-44, over 40 percent say one of the biggest benefits of working remotely is the ability to start a family, or care for a family and/or pets.

Meanwhile, a recent Blind survey shows 58.43 percent of tech pros are putting off starting a family because their cost of living is too high. Apple employees are most wary, with 69.11 percent saying the high cost of living is preventing them from getting that family going.

It’s important to note that Blind’s surveys are heavily skewed towards Silicon Valley companies and respondents. Still, the data highlights how working remotely can help alleviate cost-of-living expenses such as commuting, cultivating a thorough wardrobe, eating out, and the myriad of other small expenses that add up.

The Blind survey aside, we know migrating away from the epicenter of tech can help your bottom line in general. Living in Silicon Valley can actually drive you deep into debt, and the sentiment among tech pros there is owning a home is out of reach for all but the most absurdly compensated.

In avoiding cost and having more time to multitask work and life tasks, working remotely can help you strike a better life balance. If you’re outside Silicon Valley, financial concerns tend to improve dramatically. If you’re looking to improve your quality of life or start a family, consider how working remotely may factor in.

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2 Responses to “Studies Show Working Remotely Can Improve Your Work-Life Balance”

  1. Dan Marinescu

    definitely, yet, reality shows that most employers would reject the idea. the most famous rejecters are microsoft, amazon, apple and google. following short by oracle, ibm, you name it.
    the mentality of the early 20st century, cheese factory like “oh, you’re happy, i hate that, get the mop, work harder and not smarter, i am not paying to you learn, i am not paying you to be happy, chap chap chap soldier boy, your mouse did not move in hours” is almost everywhere in so called developed countrie
    reality shows that happy engineers are more creating. reality shows that remote positions are safer, giving employers free working hours (excited engineers work from the bottom of their hearth instead of 9-5)
    reality shows that whoever does not grasp this is not mean to be, not in any foreseeable future
    time will tell