How Much Will Experience Increase My Salary?

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The longer you spend in the technology industry, the more you can expect to earn. According to the new Dice Salary Survey, tech pros with significant levels of experience under their proverbial belt should see heady increases in annual salary.

Those very new to the tech industry, with less than a year of experience, can expect to earn $50,321 (a year-over-year increase of 9.8 percent). After a year or two, that average salary jumps to $62,517 (a whooping 24.3 percent increase, year-over-year).

Spend three to five years, and the average leaps yet again, to $68,040 (a 6.3 percent increase). Between six and ten years in the industry, salaries hit $83,143 (a rise of 6.8 percent).

Breaking the ten-year mark translates into big bucks. Those with 11 to 15 years of experience could expect to pull down $96,792 (a 3.8 percent increase over last year), while those with more than 15 years average $115,399 (a 6 percent increase).

The successive leaps in pay are unsurprising, considering how more experienced tech pros can rack up salaries, bonuses, and perks commensurate with their skill-sets and importance to their respective organizations. Once workers pass the ten-year mark, they also tend to land in management and executive positions that come with higher pay, bending the salary curve even more sharply.

While pay is a significant factor in tech pros’ decisions to stay in a particular job—some 65 percent told Dice they were anticipating changing employers this year in search of increased salary—it’s not the only element in play. Working conditions, shorter commutes, the desire for more responsibility, and perks such as education or even free food are all on the table when tech pros are debating a potential job.

Image Credit: Dooder/Shutterstock.com

Comments

3 Responses to “How Much Will Experience Increase My Salary?”

February 20, 2016 at 3:28 pm, Software Guru said:

Unfortunately, those of us with a lot of experience get passed-up for the lower salary expectations of the less skilled.

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September 19, 2016 at 12:22 pm, Ei Knowmorethanyou said:

This article is so unrealistic. You are giving young people the idea that this is reality. Is it not. With outsourcing and globalization and evolving technology and multiple mergers, etc. there are no guarantee’s.

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October 28, 2016 at 2:37 pm, Spidergabrielle said:

I did an arts degree then had to get a real job. I became an industrial electrician. Now I work in Project Management and Quality Control. I’ve been doing this 10 years. I’m 33 and I made just North of $140,000 last year. You Tech boys have fun. There’s still something to be said for starting out and working with your hands and your back.

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