Good Places and Sectors to Look for Jobs

If you want a new job before the end of the year, where should you look? Everyone knows about Silicon Valley and Austin, but there are other, less-mentioned areas that still hold promise.

For example, don’t overlook Raleigh, N.C. One example of what’s going on there: Kelly Services wants 150 full-time IT professionals, including analysts and project managers, for a local healthcare company.

Or, have you thought about central Ohio? Bill LaFayette, vice president of economic analysis at the Columbus Chamber of Commerce, told the Columbus Dispatch that local companies are struggling to find qualified IT people. Earlier this month technology services firm VisionIT was looking for nearly 100 people to fill positions in Columbus and Dublin. As of last week, 80 of those jobs remained open.

Sectors

If you don’t want to move, here’s another hint: The trail of venture capital money invariably leads to jobs. In the most recent quarter, VCs invested into consumer-facing enterprises, including a lot of social media companies. The sector raised $1.3 billion in new financing, more than double the rate of investment it saw in the year-earlier period, according to Dow Jones VentureSource.

Startups specializing in health technology are also growing. Record digitization firms received $198 million in investments during the quarter, a 27 percent jump from the year-earlier period. IT companies raised $2.3 billion in 255 deals, a 5 percent increase in deals and a 9 percent increase in capital raised. And software, which declined in 2009, raised $1.2 billion for 184 deals, a 26 percent increase.

Photo: Gabriel Millos via Wikimedia

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No Responses to “Good Places and Sectors to Look for Jobs”

August 04, 2011 at 10:41 am, tim sanko said:

I have been offered $20 – 30 less than I have been making to return to Cleveland, or Columbus, OH. Reason they are posting all these low paying jobs is to fill with H1B foreigners.

Columbus offers come in, but the money I have been offered is less than I was making in 1985.

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August 06, 2011 at 5:36 pm, trothaar said:

The cost of living in Ohio is very cheap, so I would have been willing to take a job there if it paid $30,000.00. Alas, I’m just not qualified for tech jobs, and I never will be.

Even if the jobs just pay $20,000.00, it’s entirely possible to live in Ohio on that. You wouldn’t live large, but you could afford a small studio apartment. Perhaps that is why they are importing Mexican workers. Most Mexicans, no matter how educated, cannot even earn $10.00/day in Mexico, so $10.00/hour is so much as to be unfathomable.

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August 04, 2011 at 3:04 pm, TR said:

—–Bill LaFayette, vice president of economic analysis at the Columbus Chamber of Commerce, says local companies are struggling to find qualified IT people. Earlier this month technology services firm VisionIT was looking for nearly 100 people to fill positions in Columbus and Dublin. As of last week, 80 of those jobs remained open.——

After reading this article, as well as the linked article in the Columbus Dispatch, I decided to send VisionIT my resume. Big surprise: it was ignored, despite their cries that they are “struggling” to find “qualified” workers. The bottom line is that VisionIT would much rather import workers from Mexico than train Americans.

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August 06, 2011 at 4:30 pm, Mark Feffer said:

TR, I’m curious: Did you tweak the resume to match the company?

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August 06, 2011 at 5:31 pm, trothaar said:

Unfortunately, I couldn’t, because I don’t have a technical background, just a technical degree. I don’t have anything I can highlight in previous jobs that would be at all relevant to a technical position, and I cannot recite a long list of programming languages and technologies that I am fluent in.

For that reason, I was not surprised when I did not hear from them. Although I find it very difficult to believe that Mexico is producing a plethora of computer science geniuses. This is not a slight against Mexicans or a statement about immigration, just an observation that Mexico isn’t exactly known as an IT hot spot. Thanks to the caste system down there, very few Mexicans can afford to attend high school, let alone university.

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August 04, 2011 at 3:16 pm, Ken Castleberry said:

WHAT DOES THIS ARTICLE HAVE TO WITH ” How to Avoid Self-Destructing During Interviews?”

This link does NOT lead to the title. This is of NO use to me! Come on Guys, please get it right. I been looking for a job for 6 months and don’t have time to waste chasing bad links to articles I don’t need to read.

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August 06, 2011 at 4:29 pm, Mark Feffer said:

Ken, I do apologize. Obviously, we screwed up during the editing process. The correct link is:

http://insights.dice.com/2011/07/25/don’t-self-destruct-during-interviews/

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August 05, 2011 at 11:38 am, Al Gibbons said:

Good article, short & sweet & helps pull back those blinders … better presentation than a video … IT & other prfessionals know how to read, alot have shortnesss of attention issues or time constraints

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August 11, 2011 at 7:53 am, Manasia said:

Notice how the dispatch article magically 404’s

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August 11, 2011 at 8:04 am, Mark Feffer said:

Thanks for pointing that out. All I can say is it worked earlier. So, I’ve added a citation.

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