DiceTV: How to Move Into Project Management

Given IT’s changing landscape, it seems there are few sure positions left. Oh, there’ll be jobs but they probably won’t involve a lot of what you’re doing today. Here’s one way to leverage your knowledge into better job security: Become a project manager.

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No Responses to “DiceTV: How to Move Into Project Management”

July 14, 2011 at 12:42 pm, bimplebean said:

This is not a ‘how to’, it is a ‘why to.’ How *does* one move into project management? How do you get certifications? Where do you go? What does it cost?

This was very cute and perky, but the only valuable knowledge imparted here was the fact that project management is a portable skill and that it’s difficult because you’re boss of the project, not of the workers. Other than that this was very fluffy.

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July 15, 2011 at 4:34 pm, Mike said:

Job security? LOL. ROFLOL.

I made the mistake some time ago of believing others when they told me my job was secure. What they underestimated was the one person who wanted me gone.

In any case:

Being a “certified” PM only means you earned a certification. It does not mean you have the necessary skills to build and maintain a group of disparate personalities who are, at least theoretically, all moving toward the same goal.

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July 21, 2011 at 12:26 pm, Marty McFartlenburg said:

I enjoy reading resumes where the person lead a team to coordinate a storeroom inventory, or supervised telemarketers or something— and they put on thier resumes: Project Manager. Unless there’s different interpretations, levels, or labels of management in other industries I’m not familiar with— this is a stretch by all means.

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July 21, 2011 at 1:45 pm, Realistic_01 said:

She says that to move into project management you need to get certified in project management, but to get certified in project management you have to have experience in project management. That about says it all. Worthless video and a waste of time.

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July 21, 2011 at 2:33 pm, Leslie Dice Expert said:

Dear Realistic_01,

Since most certification programs require hands-on experience, PMs usually move up through the ranks and then get certified. However, you can take free online courses and partner with an experienced PM to help you acquire the basic knowledge and land your first opportunity. Also note that the PMI institute offers a Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) and the requirements include a high school diploma and 1,500 hours of experience OR 23 hours of education. I clicked into some of the 17,000 PM job postings on the board, and many listed certification as desirable—not a requirement. Some companies are even training project managers in house. Cat is right, project management is hot! And there are lots of PMs who found a way to break into the field.

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July 21, 2011 at 2:49 pm, bimplebean said:

If only this information had been included in the video…

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July 22, 2011 at 1:27 pm, ic747 said:

TRANSCRIPT PLEASE!

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July 27, 2011 at 8:47 pm, Mark said:

A key point I agree with 100%. Project managers who have IT experience first perform better with less hand-holding than generic project managers. 10 years ago, PMI had the mindset that once you were a trained project manager with a little experience, you could manage any kind of project. Only in the past two years have they changed their tune.

Better to start in IT (or whateve your field of expertise) and then adapt project management into your overall skills than to be a project manager first and then try to function in the world of IT projects.

But . . . if you are the type of person whose natural aptitude is to since in your cube and code, and avoid working with difficult people, don’t even think about project management. It won’t work.

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September 14, 2011 at 5:44 pm, Fred said:

Made me think, I may have done project management and not realized I have.

I have estimated projects, and defined the critical paths. Motivated people, and coordinated several teams in different departments, to provide what was needed for project, but I was not there boss. Documented the project and gave power point presentations on the project. Arranged meetings and planned the project with other managers. Made sure the team was on schedule with their tasks. Then put on my developer hat and participated in the architecture, coding and deployment of the projects as well.

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