CIOs are Optimistic About Growth. If Only They Could Find the Tech Professionals…

CIOs at leading technology companies are looking to
increase hiring of IT professionals in the fourth quarter of 2010, but are having troubling finding qualified candidates.

So says Robert Half, anyway. In its Professional
Employment Report
for Q4 of 2010, the recruiter found that 84 percent of CIOs
were optimistic about their organization’s ability to expand in the next
three months, but only at a modest 3 percent. 

Tech companies will hire new employees at about half the pace
of other industries for two reasons: the lagging economy and the
inability to find qualified IT specialists. Fifty one percent
of the surveyed CIOs said a lack of tech talent prevented them from filling
open positions, up 7 percent from last quarter.

The top positions in demand are
network administrators experienced with cloud computing, Voice over Internet Protocol
(VoIP) and Software as a Service (SaaS); applications developers and Web
developers; and help desk and desktop support professionals.

Robert Half International’s study was promising overall, finding
that 86 percent of executives in major industries are "very" or "somewhat" confident that their companies
will record significant sales and earnings growth in the fourth quarter.

Chandler Harris 

Comments

52 Responses to “CIOs are Optimistic About Growth. If Only They Could Find the Tech Professionals…”

September 16, 2010 at 1:13 am, Anthony said:

Thank you BambiB for the comment about foreigners taking American jobs. It’s high time something is done to stop, not stem, but stop, sending jobs ‘offshore’. Being a former V.P. of IT, let me send this challenge out to any CIO worth their paycheck. Show me how using the “global talent” pool really works for you. Factor in of course the ton of domestic talent available, professionals in this country who could ‘telecommute’ and hence help contain your development and support costs, American men an women out of work who would gladly work for less than they were when they were outsourced, no ‘latency’ waiting for communications to be addressed half way around the world and the ongoing lack of knowledge about American business that our offshore resources have. If you’re a CIO reading this and chuckling, wait, the day will come when your job will go to. Just give it time.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 1:13 am, Anthony said:

Thank you BambiB for the comment about foreigners taking American jobs. It’s high time something is done to stop, not stem, but stop, sending jobs ‘offshore’. Being a former V.P. of IT, let me send this challenge out to any CIO worth their paycheck. Show me how using the “global talent” pool really works for you. Factor in of course the ton of domestic talent available, professionals in this country who could ‘telecommute’ and hence help contain your development and support costs, American men an women out of work who would gladly work for less than they were when they were outsourced, no ‘latency’ waiting for communications to be addressed half way around the world and the ongoing lack of knowledge about American business that our offshore resources have. If you’re a CIO reading this and chuckling, wait, the day will come when your job will go to. Just give it time.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 1:53 am, GetReal said:

Same old BS to allow the importation of cheap foreign labor.

I have to wonder why, if any employers are sincere, they would willingly pay recruiters?

How many times have we read that recruiters only glance at a resume for 3 seconds?

I wouldn’t pay such a person to hire for an important position at my company. How would they possibly be able to select the best candidates, by buzzwords?

Recruitment is a cheap and shoddy profession if practiced in that manner. I feel for the ones that actually make the effort.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 1:53 am, GetReal said:

Same old BS to allow the importation of cheap foreign labor.

I have to wonder why, if any employers are sincere, they would willingly pay recruiters?

How many times have we read that recruiters only glance at a resume for 3 seconds?

I wouldn’t pay such a person to hire for an important position at my company. How would they possibly be able to select the best candidates, by buzzwords?

Recruitment is a cheap and shoddy profession if practiced in that manner. I feel for the ones that actually make the effort.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 3:14 am, shorty said:

Right . . . like we haven’t heard this song and dance before. . . for decades. These are the same guys that gut the training budget in a heartbeat, or scream for L1s or H1Bs.

There are two fathers to this country: George Washington… long dead… and Benedict Arnold … alive and kicking. I’ll bet one of his decendants is a CIO.

dixi.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 3:14 am, shorty said:

Right . . . like we haven’t heard this song and dance before. . . for decades. These are the same guys that gut the training budget in a heartbeat, or scream for L1s or H1Bs.

There are two fathers to this country: George Washington… long dead… and Benedict Arnold … alive and kicking. I’ll bet one of his decendants is a CIO.

dixi.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 8:55 am, Carlo said:

I laugh when I read the want ads (currently unemployed), where so many are offering ‘entry-level’ positions (meaning very low pay), but yet the job description may go like this:

Wanted: Network Administrator

5-10 Years C++, Perl experience.
5 Years Web Development.
System administration. Linux, Solaris, Windows.
Minimum 5 years Security.
Project Management.
Minimum 5 year Cisco and Juniper Experience.
Extensive router, switch and voip experience.
SAN expert level.

Certifications. Minimum MCSE, CCSP, CCNP.

We are a 24x7x65 operation. (meaning you are always on call and expect long hours).

No wonder CIOs are not able to find ‘qualified’ IT personnel! They want us to fill 5 positions for a quarter of the price…

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 8:55 am, Carlo said:

I laugh when I read the want ads (currently unemployed), where so many are offering ‘entry-level’ positions (meaning very low pay), but yet the job description may go like this:

Wanted: Network Administrator

5-10 Years C++, Perl experience.
5 Years Web Development.
System administration. Linux, Solaris, Windows.
Minimum 5 years Security.
Project Management.
Minimum 5 year Cisco and Juniper Experience.
Extensive router, switch and voip experience.
SAN expert level.

Certifications. Minimum MCSE, CCSP, CCNP.

We are a 24x7x65 operation. (meaning you are always on call and expect long hours).

No wonder CIOs are not able to find ‘qualified’ IT personnel! They want us to fill 5 positions for a quarter of the price…

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 8:59 am, Larry J. said:

When I hear about a “shortage” or “inability to find qualified IT specialists”, it reminds me of several times (as a Electrical Engineer with a Master’s degree) of similar comments from those trying to hire more engineers.
What this usually means is that the person or company making the comment can’t find the exact (IDEAL) person they want as written up in the job description. If you have ever written a job description for a position or had one of your people do it for you, you know that the requirements listed in that job description are for the IDEAL candidate. IDEAL candidates are very hard to find, even when you are looking real hard.
One of the problems is that the personnel department of companies are not populated by technical people, and, as a result, eliminate many candidates who could do the job with a little training.
One solution that would require more effort would be to have the person who makes up the job description include a list of the position’s absolute minimum requirements for personnel to use to filter the resumes. It would take more work on the management’s part to review more resumes, but they might just find the person that will fill the actual need, (maybe even do only 75% of the job on the first day, and get training for the other parts later) not the IDEAL person who can do 100% of the job on day one.
I think that if there is a REAL shortage and a REAL need that something like the situation described above will have to happen.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 8:59 am, Larry J. said:

When I hear about a “shortage” or “inability to find qualified IT specialists”, it reminds me of several times (as a Electrical Engineer with a Master’s degree) of similar comments from those trying to hire more engineers.
What this usually means is that the person or company making the comment can’t find the exact (IDEAL) person they want as written up in the job description. If you have ever written a job description for a position or had one of your people do it for you, you know that the requirements listed in that job description are for the IDEAL candidate. IDEAL candidates are very hard to find, even when you are looking real hard.
One of the problems is that the personnel department of companies are not populated by technical people, and, as a result, eliminate many candidates who could do the job with a little training.
One solution that would require more effort would be to have the person who makes up the job description include a list of the position’s absolute minimum requirements for personnel to use to filter the resumes. It would take more work on the management’s part to review more resumes, but they might just find the person that will fill the actual need, (maybe even do only 75% of the job on the first day, and get training for the other parts later) not the IDEAL person who can do 100% of the job on day one.
I think that if there is a REAL shortage and a REAL need that something like the situation described above will have to happen.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:14 am, Kyle T said:

If there is such a shortage of “qualified” IT pros, bare in mind things change rapidly and finding people that have the latest skills requires individuals to pay big bucks themselves to remain competative. It isn’t always feasible, especially if one has been out of work. Hire intelligent people and give them some slack on not knowing everything, and having every certification known to the Universe and TRAIN them to fit your requirements. THAT is usuallly a ROI that benefits both company and IT Pro.
Stop hiring outside of the US!
KT

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:14 am, Kyle T said:

If there is such a shortage of “qualified” IT pros, bare in mind things change rapidly and finding people that have the latest skills requires individuals to pay big bucks themselves to remain competative. It isn’t always feasible, especially if one has been out of work. Hire intelligent people and give them some slack on not knowing everything, and having every certification known to the Universe and TRAIN them to fit your requirements. THAT is usuallly a ROI that benefits both company and IT Pro.
Stop hiring outside of the US!
KT

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:28 am, Tech Rep said:

Can’t find qualified IT specialists? Plenty of unemployed tech people out there that are willing to be trained. Why not give up a portion of those inflated CIO salaries and help them out and the U.S. economy.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:28 am, Tech Rep said:

Can’t find qualified IT specialists? Plenty of unemployed tech people out there that are willing to be trained. Why not give up a portion of those inflated CIO salaries and help them out and the U.S. economy.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:56 am, TechGuy said:

I have to echo some of the comments being posted to this article.

I can state positively there is no shortage of technical professionals to fill the jobs. In my state, the unemployment rate is among the highest in the country with a good portion of those unemployed coming from the various technical fields. Chances are those companies seeking technical personnel are looking for THE one technician with every single certification they specify at a salary that wouldn’t qualify as entry level in most states.

This has been my experience in the last 18 months. When I am called in for a job interview, I am either overqualified because I have almost 20 years experience in my field, or the hiring company really would prefer someone with an advanced degree/certifications that I don’t hold in spite of the years of experience. When I find a company is interested in hiring me, I also find that those companies are just seeking to take advantage of the current downturn in the economy by offering around 50% of what I was earning before. I understand why they would offer lower than what I was earning in this down economy, and I am willing to take a significant reduction. But when the level of the offer is less than what I am receiving on unemployment, the hiring company is clearly trying to get far, far more than their money’s worth in the transaction. Quite simply, I can’t afford to take that much of a reduction in earnings because I will have to take on the added expenses that I currently don’t have of wardrobe, commuting, daycare, etc. just to accept the job.

If any potential hiring managers read this – please understand that you need to be competitive in your salaries for experienced personnel and READ the resumes you receive. Make sure you understand exactly what the experience of the applicant really is. It is quite possible the applicant will be more than capable of taking on the tasks of your posted job if you think creatively how to apply their skills to your job requirements.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:56 am, TechGuy said:

I have to echo some of the comments being posted to this article.

I can state positively there is no shortage of technical professionals to fill the jobs. In my state, the unemployment rate is among the highest in the country with a good portion of those unemployed coming from the various technical fields. Chances are those companies seeking technical personnel are looking for THE one technician with every single certification they specify at a salary that wouldn’t qualify as entry level in most states.

This has been my experience in the last 18 months. When I am called in for a job interview, I am either overqualified because I have almost 20 years experience in my field, or the hiring company really would prefer someone with an advanced degree/certifications that I don’t hold in spite of the years of experience. When I find a company is interested in hiring me, I also find that those companies are just seeking to take advantage of the current downturn in the economy by offering around 50% of what I was earning before. I understand why they would offer lower than what I was earning in this down economy, and I am willing to take a significant reduction. But when the level of the offer is less than what I am receiving on unemployment, the hiring company is clearly trying to get far, far more than their money’s worth in the transaction. Quite simply, I can’t afford to take that much of a reduction in earnings because I will have to take on the added expenses that I currently don’t have of wardrobe, commuting, daycare, etc. just to accept the job.

If any potential hiring managers read this – please understand that you need to be competitive in your salaries for experienced personnel and READ the resumes you receive. Make sure you understand exactly what the experience of the applicant really is. It is quite possible the applicant will be more than capable of taking on the tasks of your posted job if you think creatively how to apply their skills to your job requirements.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:04 am, jeff said:

I think the cry of “we can’t find qualified people” is getting old. If they can’t find people, with the number of IT professionals looking for work, there is something wrong with their search criteria. They need to recognize that people can grow into.a position if their experience is close. Stop treating people like legos, where only one can fit.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:04 am, jeff said:

I think the cry of “we can’t find qualified people” is getting old. If they can’t find people, with the number of IT professionals looking for work, there is something wrong with their search criteria. They need to recognize that people can grow into.a position if their experience is close. Stop treating people like legos, where only one can fit.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:14 am, MA Assisted Living said:

I would argue there are a lot of technically talented people available for jobs. The current acronym-searching mindset prevalent in the recruitment process absolutely misses the breadth and depth of experience on a resume.

In my case, I earned a Bachelor of Engineering in Electrical Engineering. I have been working with Cisco products architecting, designing, building, and operating networks since 1992. There is nothing related to networking with Cisco gear I can’t do given a few hours to delve into details.

However, most employers don’t seem to be willing to actually read my resume to learn of my experience and abilities, since the search function has not turned up the CC-whatever acronym, or the “urgently required” technology acronym. On one hand, it proves the marketing efforts of the testing and certification industry have been highly successful. On the other, perhaps it speaks to the overload of IT and Networking managers, and the plethora of resumes they typically get after posting an available position…

I have met CCNPs that couldn’t think their way out of a paper bag. They sure could throw glossary terms around in design discussions, but add no real value when planning for high-availability within a budget or expansion the following year, or the network change’s impact to a DR plan. (I have known and worked with extremely talented CCIEs as well… )

I have been asked if I have experience on a platform that was released the previous month, when no one except beta testers would have any of the “required” experience…. This might be similar to looking for professionals experienced with cloud computing… as if every corporation is currently doing it, and the CIO looking to hire a specialist has come to the realization that his/her organization is the absolute last one to use it.

I have seen a growing number of technical job descriptions requiring advanced Cisco certifications and Microsoft certifications…. I guess finding one person to do two jobs may be difficult.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:14 am, MA Assisted Living said:

I would argue there are a lot of technically talented people available for jobs. The current acronym-searching mindset prevalent in the recruitment process absolutely misses the breadth and depth of experience on a resume.

In my case, I earned a Bachelor of Engineering in Electrical Engineering. I have been working with Cisco products architecting, designing, building, and operating networks since 1992. There is nothing related to networking with Cisco gear I can’t do given a few hours to delve into details.

However, most employers don’t seem to be willing to actually read my resume to learn of my experience and abilities, since the search function has not turned up the CC-whatever acronym, or the “urgently required” technology acronym. On one hand, it proves the marketing efforts of the testing and certification industry have been highly successful. On the other, perhaps it speaks to the overload of IT and Networking managers, and the plethora of resumes they typically get after posting an available position…

I have met CCNPs that couldn’t think their way out of a paper bag. They sure could throw glossary terms around in design discussions, but add no real value when planning for high-availability within a budget or expansion the following year, or the network change’s impact to a DR plan. (I have known and worked with extremely talented CCIEs as well… )

I have been asked if I have experience on a platform that was released the previous month, when no one except beta testers would have any of the “required” experience…. This might be similar to looking for professionals experienced with cloud computing… as if every corporation is currently doing it, and the CIO looking to hire a specialist has come to the realization that his/her organization is the absolute last one to use it.

I have seen a growing number of technical job descriptions requiring advanced Cisco certifications and Microsoft certifications…. I guess finding one person to do two jobs may be difficult.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:19 am, MA Assisted Living said:

I would argue there are a lot of technically talented people available for jobs. The current acronym-searching mindset prevalent in the recruitment process absolutely misses the breadth and depth of experience on a resume.

In my case, I earned a Bachelor of Engineering in Electrical Engineering. I have been working with Cisco products architecting, designing, building, and operating networks since 1992. There is nothing related to networking with Cisco gear I can’t do given a few hours to delve into details.

However, most employers don’t seem to be willing to actually read resumes to understand experience and abilities, since the search function has not turned up the CC-whatever or “urgently required” technology acronym. On one hand, it proves the marketing efforts of the testing and certification industry have been highly successful.

I have met CCNPs that couldn’t think their way out of a paper bag. They sure could throw glossary terms around in design discussions, but add no real value when planning for high-availability within a budget or expansion the following year, or the network change’s impact to a DR plan.

I have been asked if I have experience on a platform that was released the previous month, when no one except beta testers would have any of the “required” experience….

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:19 am, MA Assisted Living said:

I would argue there are a lot of technically talented people available for jobs. The current acronym-searching mindset prevalent in the recruitment process absolutely misses the breadth and depth of experience on a resume.

In my case, I earned a Bachelor of Engineering in Electrical Engineering. I have been working with Cisco products architecting, designing, building, and operating networks since 1992. There is nothing related to networking with Cisco gear I can’t do given a few hours to delve into details.

However, most employers don’t seem to be willing to actually read resumes to understand experience and abilities, since the search function has not turned up the CC-whatever or “urgently required” technology acronym. On one hand, it proves the marketing efforts of the testing and certification industry have been highly successful.

I have met CCNPs that couldn’t think their way out of a paper bag. They sure could throw glossary terms around in design discussions, but add no real value when planning for high-availability within a budget or expansion the following year, or the network change’s impact to a DR plan.

I have been asked if I have experience on a platform that was released the previous month, when no one except beta testers would have any of the “required” experience….

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:32 am, MA Assisted Living said:

There are a lot of technically talented people available for jobs. The current acronym-searching mindset prevalent in the recruitment process absolutely misses the breadth and depth of experience on a resume.

I earned a Bachelor of Engineering in Electrical Engineering. I have been working with Cisco products designing, building, and operating networks since 1992. There is nothing related to networking with Cisco gear I can’t do given a few hours to delve into details….

However, employers don’t seem to be willing to actually read resumes to understand experience and abilities, since the search function has not turned up the CC-whatever or “urgently required” technology acronym.

I have been asked if I have experience on a platform that was released the previous month, when no one except beta testers would have any of the “required” experience¿
Could CIOs have completely unrealistic expectations? The technically oriented ones generally don¿t, but they are increasingly rare.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:32 am, MA Assisted Living said:

There are a lot of technically talented people available for jobs. The current acronym-searching mindset prevalent in the recruitment process absolutely misses the breadth and depth of experience on a resume.

I earned a Bachelor of Engineering in Electrical Engineering. I have been working with Cisco products designing, building, and operating networks since 1992. There is nothing related to networking with Cisco gear I can’t do given a few hours to delve into details….

However, employers don’t seem to be willing to actually read resumes to understand experience and abilities, since the search function has not turned up the CC-whatever or “urgently required” technology acronym.

I have been asked if I have experience on a platform that was released the previous month, when no one except beta testers would have any of the “required” experience¿
Could CIOs have completely unrealistic expectations? The technically oriented ones generally don¿t, but they are increasingly rare.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:43 am, Tom said:

The thing that bothers me the most about articles like this is that as an IT manager for a company that forced us to use outsourcing, we were expected to accept “freshers” and train them on the applications and the technology!

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:43 am, Tom said:

The thing that bothers me the most about articles like this is that as an IT manager for a company that forced us to use outsourcing, we were expected to accept “freshers” and train them on the applications and the technology!

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:07 am, GK AS/400 Specialist - unemployed said:

When I hear about such so-called shortages, it makes me sick at my stomach, mainly because it is not true. Ask the thousands of unemployed IT specialists; ask about the hundreds of resumes they have sent out; ask about the jobs they have applied for. The unemployed know who is hiring and who is not. The unemployed know how many of these job descriptions are written to be so unrealistic, it’s not even funny.

If the CIOs knew their own field and had a handle on what the real valuable skills and talents are, then they would be able to make a decision to hire any one of these highly experienced and talented professionals. The CIOs allow the hiring heads, who know very little about IT talent, except to read questions from a prearranged document, to make a huge deal out of a couple of new buzzwords, or new simple methodology, which nine times out of ten, nearly duplicates methodology which the experienced IT candidate has already mastered years ago.

I am all too clear on what is really happening. These companies are making excuses so they can import more so-called IT professionals from other countries to dilute our possibilities here at home. Most often, these imports have, at most, a college degree and usually no experience whatsoever. This, of course, also diminishes the IT salaries.

If you want to learn a lot about what is really going on, submit yourself to unemployment for 2 years.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:07 am, GK AS/400 Specialist - unemployed said:

When I hear about such so-called shortages, it makes me sick at my stomach, mainly because it is not true. Ask the thousands of unemployed IT specialists; ask about the hundreds of resumes they have sent out; ask about the jobs they have applied for. The unemployed know who is hiring and who is not. The unemployed know how many of these job descriptions are written to be so unrealistic, it’s not even funny.

If the CIOs knew their own field and had a handle on what the real valuable skills and talents are, then they would be able to make a decision to hire any one of these highly experienced and talented professionals. The CIOs allow the hiring heads, who know very little about IT talent, except to read questions from a prearranged document, to make a huge deal out of a couple of new buzzwords, or new simple methodology, which nine times out of ten, nearly duplicates methodology which the experienced IT candidate has already mastered years ago.

I am all too clear on what is really happening. These companies are making excuses so they can import more so-called IT professionals from other countries to dilute our possibilities here at home. Most often, these imports have, at most, a college degree and usually no experience whatsoever. This, of course, also diminishes the IT salaries.

If you want to learn a lot about what is really going on, submit yourself to unemployment for 2 years.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:13 am, GK, Unemployed IT professional said:

“Your comment was marked as spam and will not be displayed.

Comment has more than 1000 characters”

Okay, so where is my comment. You did not redisplay it, so that I could modify it. Now, with my IT experience and professionalism, I would redisplay it to my user, giving him or her the opportunity to modify it and resubmit it.

But, I can’t find a job — I guess — because I am too experienced and talented.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:13 am, GK, Unemployed IT professional said:

“Your comment was marked as spam and will not be displayed.

Comment has more than 1000 characters”

Okay, so where is my comment. You did not redisplay it, so that I could modify it. Now, with my IT experience and professionalism, I would redisplay it to my user, giving him or her the opportunity to modify it and resubmit it.

But, I can’t find a job — I guess — because I am too experienced and talented.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:20 am, MA Assisted Living said:

Sorry about the triple post…. I had been given an error that the post was too long, so I kept re-trying edited versions.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:20 am, MA Assisted Living said:

Sorry about the triple post…. I had been given an error that the post was too long, so I kept re-trying edited versions.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:23 am, BambiB said:

Oh – and needless to say, even if a foreign worker IS hired, the job should continue to be listed as long as the worker is in the country. If a foreign worker is hired, it’s not a lifetime position. It’s solely because no American was available to do the job… right?

So, if an American DOES become available to do the job, the foreign worker should go, and the American should take the job.

At present, the American is not notified of the existence of the job, the foreigner keeps the job, and the American is unemployed.

This is a gaping hole in the current policy.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:23 am, BambiB said:

Oh – and needless to say, even if a foreign worker IS hired, the job should continue to be listed as long as the worker is in the country. If a foreign worker is hired, it’s not a lifetime position. It’s solely because no American was available to do the job… right?

So, if an American DOES become available to do the job, the foreign worker should go, and the American should take the job.

At present, the American is not notified of the existence of the job, the foreigner keeps the job, and the American is unemployed.

This is a gaping hole in the current policy.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:34 am, BambiB said:

Actually, it seems there are enough of us in the same boat – we should be contacting our representatives… PUBLICLY to ask why they continue to sanction the importation of foreigners to take American jobs.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:34 am, BambiB said:

Actually, it seems there are enough of us in the same boat – we should be contacting our representatives… PUBLICLY to ask why they continue to sanction the importation of foreigners to take American jobs.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:36 am, Tom S. said:

Also keep in mind that “ideal” candidates can be those that are willing to work for what the company is paying–which, as we all know, in recent years has been less and less. These companies can look all they want and they can find many qualified people, but if those people aren’t willing to work for a certain number, they can claim that they can’t find anyone. I’ve personally seen this happen at three of my past employers, and every time they use it as an excuse to hire “global talent” that is willing to work for next to nothing.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:36 am, Tom S. said:

Also keep in mind that “ideal” candidates can be those that are willing to work for what the company is paying–which, as we all know, in recent years has been less and less. These companies can look all they want and they can find many qualified people, but if those people aren’t willing to work for a certain number, they can claim that they can’t find anyone. I’ve personally seen this happen at three of my past employers, and every time they use it as an excuse to hire “global talent” that is willing to work for next to nothing.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 12:01 am, DH said:

I can agree with several points:

I was a storage administrator for a major east coast mainframe shop for 29 years. They outsourced and after 7 difficult years working for the outsourcer (4th largest in the world and 3 letters), the outsourcer was acquired by a big name US copier company you can figure out easily.

And the layoffs increased as the workload increased…. training those who would take our jobs and they lived in Mexico, India, and some in Ireland. Nice folks who could barely speak English in 60-80% of the cases, except Ireland. And their reduced USD salaries leave the USA, never to return. And the USA is left with experienced 45-60 year old people who kept the IT shop running… laid off.

This is a sickness of chasing the offshoring bandwagon, just like distributed computing was in earlier decades. And you don not want to think about the security issue raised when your bulk of support people are in an India ‘Silicon Valley’ or in Mexico City with now and again earthquakes.

“But we have to remain competitive…” as Wellpoint/Anthem or Mac Donald’s leaves the outsourcer in frustration.

This is the crisis of American management leading us to a ‘globalization’ more akin to Balkanization.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 12:01 am, DH said:

I can agree with several points:

I was a storage administrator for a major east coast mainframe shop for 29 years. They outsourced and after 7 difficult years working for the outsourcer (4th largest in the world and 3 letters), the outsourcer was acquired by a big name US copier company you can figure out easily.

And the layoffs increased as the workload increased…. training those who would take our jobs and they lived in Mexico, India, and some in Ireland. Nice folks who could barely speak English in 60-80% of the cases, except Ireland. And their reduced USD salaries leave the USA, never to return. And the USA is left with experienced 45-60 year old people who kept the IT shop running… laid off.

This is a sickness of chasing the offshoring bandwagon, just like distributed computing was in earlier decades. And you don not want to think about the security issue raised when your bulk of support people are in an India ‘Silicon Valley’ or in Mexico City with now and again earthquakes.

“But we have to remain competitive…” as Wellpoint/Anthem or Mac Donald’s leaves the outsourcer in frustration.

This is the crisis of American management leading us to a ‘globalization’ more akin to Balkanization.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 12:04 am, DH said:

…. training those who take our jobs and they live in Mexico, India, and some in Ireland. Nice folks who could barely speak English in 60-80% of the cases, except Ireland. And their reduced USD salaries leave the USA, never to return. And the USA is left with experienced 45-60 year old people who kept the IT shop running… laid off.

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September 17, 2010 at 12:04 am, DH said:

…. training those who take our jobs and they live in Mexico, India, and some in Ireland. Nice folks who could barely speak English in 60-80% of the cases, except Ireland. And their reduced USD salaries leave the USA, never to return. And the USA is left with experienced 45-60 year old people who kept the IT shop running… laid off.

Reply

September 18, 2010 at 7:16 am, Keynote said:

Unlike Bill Gates, I think new H1B visa’s should be suspended until most of the displaced IT workers in this country secure jobs.

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September 18, 2010 at 7:16 am, Keynote said:

Unlike Bill Gates, I think new H1B visa’s should be suspended until most of the displaced IT workers in this country secure jobs.

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September 19, 2010 at 3:21 am, Get Real said:

Hey Dice,

Based on the responses of real people, and the number of qualified professionals you can easily determine, that are using your site and can’t find jobs….

You should flush these types of articles down the toilet, instead of posting them and participating in trying to mislead the public.

Reply

September 19, 2010 at 3:21 am, Get Real said:

Hey Dice,

Based on the responses of real people, and the number of qualified professionals you can easily determine, that are using your site and can’t find jobs….

You should flush these types of articles down the toilet, instead of posting them and participating in trying to mislead the public.

Reply

September 20, 2010 at 4:47 am, Mark Laska said:

I don’t know what all the complaints are about.

The job description/skills that are required take 1 page. Surely, with the current requirement of a 1 to 2 page resume you can put all the experience, positions, education and accomplishments.

20 years ago, I was told to list all the equipment that I worked on, it only took 2 pages single spaced. Today, I have more education and more to say on my qualifications…just listing things is over 2 pages.

Unrealistic expectations.

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September 20, 2010 at 4:47 am, Mark Laska said:

I don’t know what all the complaints are about.

The job description/skills that are required take 1 page. Surely, with the current requirement of a 1 to 2 page resume you can put all the experience, positions, education and accomplishments.

20 years ago, I was told to list all the equipment that I worked on, it only took 2 pages single spaced. Today, I have more education and more to say on my qualifications…just listing things is over 2 pages.

Unrealistic expectations.

Reply

September 22, 2010 at 11:37 am, Mark said:

I just got word that I didn’t get a contract job because I was over-qualified. Someone can’t get a contract job because they have more skills than what are needed?

As a military veteran, I am not asking for a handout. I want to work. We have a problem in this country when someone is not allowed to work because they have worked hard during their life. When my savings run out and I am in the food line and it is minus 20 degrees in Minnesota, do you think I will get hired for the jobs I can do?

As a diabetic that needs a CPAP machine so that I can breathe when I sleep, do you really think that these people know that they are sentencing me to die or become a cripple not because I can’t do the work but because I could do it too well?

Reply

September 22, 2010 at 11:37 am, Mark said:

I just got word that I didn’t get a contract job because I was over-qualified. Someone can’t get a contract job because they have more skills than what are needed?

As a military veteran, I am not asking for a handout. I want to work. We have a problem in this country when someone is not allowed to work because they have worked hard during their life. When my savings run out and I am in the food line and it is minus 20 degrees in Minnesota, do you think I will get hired for the jobs I can do?

As a diabetic that needs a CPAP machine so that I can breathe when I sleep, do you really think that these people know that they are sentencing me to die or become a cripple not because I can’t do the work but because I could do it too well?

Reply

September 23, 2010 at 12:02 am, Rick T said:

Well if the HR staff in these organizations would stop writing up job descriptions that call for the ultimate employee then they would find all the qualified techs they need. No matter what kind of experience you have, when you go into a new position you have to learn the way they do the job its that plain and simple.
Sure they want the best person for the job and want them to hit the ground running but you still have to learn their way.

If these companies would drop the ultimate employee attitude and wanting someone with every certification in the technology field they would find all the help they need out there now waiting to be hired in.

Reply

September 23, 2010 at 12:02 am, Rick T said:

Well if the HR staff in these organizations would stop writing up job descriptions that call for the ultimate employee then they would find all the qualified techs they need. No matter what kind of experience you have, when you go into a new position you have to learn the way they do the job its that plain and simple.
Sure they want the best person for the job and want them to hit the ground running but you still have to learn their way.

If these companies would drop the ultimate employee attitude and wanting someone with every certification in the technology field they would find all the help they need out there now waiting to be hired in.

Reply

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