DiceTV Update: Are You Ready for the New IT?

 

What IT will look like in the future – Ever think of working with mainframes? – And it’s not a pretty picture when it comes to women in tech.

So, you’re the IT workforce. How’re you changing? Let’s look at what some observers say. First, you’re becoming less focused on building and delivering services and more focused on integrating and managing them. Big companies increasingly want to hire smart, tech-savvy, business professionals for 20- or 30-year multifaceted careers – not simply for careers in IT. You’re going to work in a different environment: Some expect a number of trends will continue to gain steam over the next ten years. Like globalization, increased specialization, and more demand for certifications. Most dramatically, the cloud will allow IT jobs to be virtualized, like servers, storage and desktops are becoming virtualized. Finally, the most in-demand skills will be data-mining, security, and IT risk management.

Companies like IBM and CA Technologies are struggling to replace the Baby Boomers who support their mainframe businesses. IBM has created a curriculum designed to encourage the teaching of mainframe skills and distributed it to schools in 61 countries. Meanwhile, CA has changed the look of mainframe software to make it more appealing to the generation that prefers the iPad, iPods to a terminal interface. Actually, I guess they prefer pretty much anything to a terminal interface.

The number of women in technology has been growing in recent years. But still, they only have a small portion of IT leadership positions. According to the National Center for Women & Information Technology, 25 percent of professional IT-related occupations in the U.S. workforce were filled by women in 2008. Only 11 percent of corporate officers in Fortune 500 tech companies were women. The center has a lot of data. Check out its website.

— Mark Feffer

DiceTV Update: Are You Ready for the New IT?

Comments

12 Responses to “DiceTV Update: Are You Ready for the New IT?”

September 09, 2010 at 12:08 am, sclark said:

agreed. I have 20 years mainframe.. responded to a few of thos COBOL people ads. NOt a peep. H-IB visa’s are the rule for IT industry in the U.S. The party’s over..

Reply

September 09, 2010 at 12:08 am, sclark said:

agreed. I have 20 years mainframe.. responded to a few of thos COBOL people ads. NOt a peep. H-IB visa’s are the rule for IT industry in the U.S. The party’s over..

Reply

September 09, 2010 at 8:27 am, NomoreBS said:

IBM and CA want super cheap labor for the mainframe like everything else. Hence their emphasis on outsourcing and training foreign labor. There are no mainframe jobs in the US. The baby boomer story in a myth. I know a lot of boomers still looking for those non-existent stateside mainframe jobs.

Reply

September 09, 2010 at 8:27 am, NomoreBS said:

IBM and CA want super cheap labor for the mainframe like everything else. Hence their emphasis on outsourcing and training foreign labor. There are no mainframe jobs in the US. The baby boomer story in a myth. I know a lot of boomers still looking for those non-existent stateside mainframe jobs.

Reply

September 09, 2010 at 11:02 am, 0ajdsrgo said:

I really get tired of hearing writers bemoan the lack of women in IT as if there is some secret agenda purposely trying to keep them out or somehow there is something wrong with how we teach IT so that it isn’t attractive to women. Let’s get something straight, no one is holding a gun to womens heads telling them they cannot go into IT. IT IS THEIR CHOICE not to do so and theirs alone. If IT doesn’t strike their fancy, then why do we have to try to make it so that it is? They are adults aren’t they? Can’t they make their own decisions? So, let’s quit all this whining about the lack of women in IT. Possibly in no other time in history have women had the freedom to choose what they do for a living. If they don’t choose IT, then so be it. Quit coddling to women, if they don’t have the backbone to make their own decisions, they we shouldn’t be having to hold their little hands. No one held my hand to lead me into IT. It was my choice and I acted on it. Let them do the same.

Reply

September 09, 2010 at 11:02 am, 0ajdsrgo said:

I really get tired of hearing writers bemoan the lack of women in IT as if there is some secret agenda purposely trying to keep them out or somehow there is something wrong with how we teach IT so that it isn’t attractive to women. Let’s get something straight, no one is holding a gun to womens heads telling them they cannot go into IT. IT IS THEIR CHOICE not to do so and theirs alone. If IT doesn’t strike their fancy, then why do we have to try to make it so that it is? They are adults aren’t they? Can’t they make their own decisions? So, let’s quit all this whining about the lack of women in IT. Possibly in no other time in history have women had the freedom to choose what they do for a living. If they don’t choose IT, then so be it. Quit coddling to women, if they don’t have the backbone to make their own decisions, they we shouldn’t be having to hold their little hands. No one held my hand to lead me into IT. It was my choice and I acted on it. Let them do the same.

Reply

September 15, 2010 at 10:03 am, Michael A. Sommers said:

Mark, I really enjoy your commentaries. You are doing an excellent job.
I have a question. Whay do you think would be the best way for a 50 year old, former Mainframe Computer Programmer who was laid off then terminated from his job when a foreign company took over 80% of the IT work involved with his job, to get back into IT?.
I have actually been out of IT for over 2 years and I am worried that my age coupled with having a 20 year old skill set paints a gloomy picture for my future. Do you think getting a certification in a particular area like Database systems technologies might be a good way to go? If not, what else would you suggest?
If you have time, please respond to my questions in an email.
Thank You.
Sincerely,
Michael A. Sommers
Former IT pro now working at a Retail Supermarket

Reply

September 15, 2010 at 10:03 am, Michael A. Sommers said:

Mark, I really enjoy your commentaries. You are doing an excellent job.
I have a question. Whay do you think would be the best way for a 50 year old, former Mainframe Computer Programmer who was laid off then terminated from his job when a foreign company took over 80% of the IT work involved with his job, to get back into IT?.
I have actually been out of IT for over 2 years and I am worried that my age coupled with having a 20 year old skill set paints a gloomy picture for my future. Do you think getting a certification in a particular area like Database systems technologies might be a good way to go? If not, what else would you suggest?
If you have time, please respond to my questions in an email.
Thank You.
Sincerely,
Michael A. Sommers
Former IT pro now working at a Retail Supermarket

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 4:56 am, SWmom said:

American women have never been welcome in IT by American men. When I first started in IT I heard things like “Oh, you must’ve screwed someone to get this job”. Or “You’re just taking a job away from some man who is trying to support a family”. Double-standards were the norm: if a guy made a mistake it was “oh he just made a little mistake” . If I made a mistake (I’ve made plenty, screwing up isn’t a male prerogative 🙂 )it was “OMG YOU MADE A MISTAKE!!! HEY EVERYBODY – SHE MADE A MISTAKE!”. Its hard to build camaraderie and team spirit when you are constantly treated with a certain degree of ostracism.

And now its even worse with the foreign competition – I have heard repeatedly “You American women are all rich and do not need your jobs” in the same sing-song tone of voice over and over and over from many, er, “consultants”.

I choose to persist in this profession because I am very good at it. And I am more fortunate than most women in that I’ve been able to stay in the tech field because, frankly, I am that much better than most others in my niche, male or female. No whine, just fact.

I do agree with 0ajdsrgo that its time to stop whining and coddling. Truthfully I think America’s favorite pasttime has become whining. Everyone feels sorry for themselves these days. Itty-boo.

I also agree that the baby boomer assertion in this article is total fantasy.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 4:56 am, SWmom said:

American women have never been welcome in IT by American men. When I first started in IT I heard things like “Oh, you must’ve screwed someone to get this job”. Or “You’re just taking a job away from some man who is trying to support a family”. Double-standards were the norm: if a guy made a mistake it was “oh he just made a little mistake” . If I made a mistake (I’ve made plenty, screwing up isn’t a male prerogative 🙂 )it was “OMG YOU MADE A MISTAKE!!! HEY EVERYBODY – SHE MADE A MISTAKE!”. Its hard to build camaraderie and team spirit when you are constantly treated with a certain degree of ostracism.

And now its even worse with the foreign competition – I have heard repeatedly “You American women are all rich and do not need your jobs” in the same sing-song tone of voice over and over and over from many, er, “consultants”.

I choose to persist in this profession because I am very good at it. And I am more fortunate than most women in that I’ve been able to stay in the tech field because, frankly, I am that much better than most others in my niche, male or female. No whine, just fact.

I do agree with 0ajdsrgo that its time to stop whining and coddling. Truthfully I think America’s favorite pasttime has become whining. Everyone feels sorry for themselves these days. Itty-boo.

I also agree that the baby boomer assertion in this article is total fantasy.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 7:24 am, HelpfulAdvisor said:

Not sure I agree with the “increased specialization” assessment. Every job posting I’ve ever seen in the past 5 years has been for IT pros that have a long list of mastery in many different disciplines. (Which by the way, I have yet to meet one person who has all these skills hiring managers are demanding)

No longer can a Microsoft engineer just focus on Microsoft. He better know Cisco or he’ll go hungry before landing his next position. And before anyone says that’s normal, it wasn’t always that way.

You could be a LAN specialist, and leave the WAN up to WAN specialists, and vice versa. You also had messaging experts, as well as security and other specialists who were able to focus on their chosen and particular discipline.

Not seeing much “specialization” in today’s job postings. It’s better to be more realistic in what really is, so that readers and viewers can get good information on how to best prepare for the changing tide of IT.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 7:24 am, HelpfulAdvisor said:

Not sure I agree with the “increased specialization” assessment. Every job posting I’ve ever seen in the past 5 years has been for IT pros that have a long list of mastery in many different disciplines. (Which by the way, I have yet to meet one person who has all these skills hiring managers are demanding)

No longer can a Microsoft engineer just focus on Microsoft. He better know Cisco or he’ll go hungry before landing his next position. And before anyone says that’s normal, it wasn’t always that way.

You could be a LAN specialist, and leave the WAN up to WAN specialists, and vice versa. You also had messaging experts, as well as security and other specialists who were able to focus on their chosen and particular discipline.

Not seeing much “specialization” in today’s job postings. It’s better to be more realistic in what really is, so that readers and viewers can get good information on how to best prepare for the changing tide of IT.

Reply

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