DiceTV Update: A Forty Hour Work Week? Ha. Hahahaha.

 

This week: Do 40-hour work weeks exist? The malware threat keeps on growing. And why you shouldn’t drink if lunch or dinner’s part of your interview.

Our Main Points:

IBM users met in Boston to discuss the Mythical 40-Hour Week. They said the new normal is 60-hour weeks and being interrupted – a lot – during time off and vacations. At the same time, the Corporate Executive Board, a research firm, says IT employees are less willing to put in extra time since the recession began. That’s interesting when you consider tech professionals are usually more motivated by the technology they’re working with than who they’re working for. So while all those corporate restructurings may have created new opportunities for workers, companies may not be making that clear. Which is a shame, because it means good employees may leave.

McAfee’s new threat report shows hackers were really busy during the first half – busier than they’ve ever been. More than 10 million new pieces of malware were found by security researchers – more than 6 million in the second quarter alone. That spike in the second quarter came largely because attackers latched onto big events – like soccer’s World Cup – to push malicious websites and attachments. The most common attacks in the second quarter were on portable storage devices. To combat this, McAfee says security organizations should move from being reactive to predictive.

Having an interview over lunch or dinner? No alcohol for you. Reuters says a new study found managers associate alcohol with “cognitive impairment” on the part of candidates they see with a drink. That includes even holding a drink. So that’s another reason to keep your keg parties off your Facebook page.If the manager orders a drink, by the way – you still shouldn’t order one. And if the manager orders a soft drink herself then you really should stick to soda or whatever. They really don’t like it when you miss that cue.

— Mark Feffer

Comments

4 Responses to “DiceTV Update: A Forty Hour Work Week? Ha. Hahahaha.”

August 23, 2010 at 1:59 am, Dave said:

Regarding alcohol in interviews: Many years ago when I was young and not so smart — but not a big drinker, either — I went on an interview for a sales engineer position while I was experiencing a few flu-like symptoms. I was running a very low fever, but holding up OK. The interview was nearly over and had gone great, I thought, when my interviewers announced they had landed a big customer and were celebrating with champagne, and would I like some? Without thinking of my already-impaired condition, I said sure, and they gave me a little in a paper cup. The small amount of alcohol hit me like a ton of bricks, and I fairly stumbled through the rest of the interview. Naturally, I never heard from them again.

Reply

August 23, 2010 at 1:59 am, Dave said:

Regarding alcohol in interviews: Many years ago when I was young and not so smart — but not a big drinker, either — I went on an interview for a sales engineer position while I was experiencing a few flu-like symptoms. I was running a very low fever, but holding up OK. The interview was nearly over and had gone great, I thought, when my interviewers announced they had landed a big customer and were celebrating with champagne, and would I like some? Without thinking of my already-impaired condition, I said sure, and they gave me a little in a paper cup. The small amount of alcohol hit me like a ton of bricks, and I fairly stumbled through the rest of the interview. Naturally, I never heard from them again.

Reply

August 31, 2010 at 11:24 am, Chris said:

Be especially careful of using alcohol, or even freely admitting to doing so, when interviewing for jobs requiring government security clearances – particularly higher level clearances. It often goes beyond whether the interviewed person has a real drinking problem that will in any way actually impair their job performance. In many government organizations requiring clearances, there is a fairly significant fraction of conservative or religious employees that believe in complete abstinence. If there is even the slightest perception that a candidate has a drinking problem, the clearance investigator may dwell on it during the clearance investigation. Even one episode of being drunk, from several years before, can cause the investigator to start asking the candidate questions and hold up the clearance. Sometimes, even “just one drink a week” isn’t a good enough answer; they want to hear you say “Never”. However, it’s a bad idea to blatantly lie, if it can be verified that you have been seen on occasion with a drink.

Reply

August 31, 2010 at 11:24 am, Chris said:

Be especially careful of using alcohol, or even freely admitting to doing so, when interviewing for jobs requiring government security clearances – particularly higher level clearances. It often goes beyond whether the interviewed person has a real drinking problem that will in any way actually impair their job performance. In many government organizations requiring clearances, there is a fairly significant fraction of conservative or religious employees that believe in complete abstinence. If there is even the slightest perception that a candidate has a drinking problem, the clearance investigator may dwell on it during the clearance investigation. Even one episode of being drunk, from several years before, can cause the investigator to start asking the candidate questions and hold up the clearance. Sometimes, even “just one drink a week” isn’t a good enough answer; they want to hear you say “Never”. However, it’s a bad idea to blatantly lie, if it can be verified that you have been seen on occasion with a drink.

Reply

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