DiceTV: How to Fight the ‘Overqualified’ Label in Interviews

 

If you’re a “seasoned” IT professional, you have to overcome managers’ subliminal fears and communicate your value to win the job and justify a higher salary. Here’s how.

The Script

 

Cat: Let’s see, I know C++, .NET, a few legacy programs like COBOL. That’ll save a company – $15,000 annually. They won’t need to hire someone to update those older programs.

If you’re a … seasoned IT professional, you have to overcome managers’ subliminal fears and communicate your value to win the job and justify a higher salary. Here’s how. I’m Cat Miller and this is Dice TV.

So. Let’s play interview.

Q: Are you willing to learn new technologies?

A: I’m very willing. In fact, I recently learned a mobile operating system in two weeks and created an app that has over 2,000 subscribers. And I’m so disciplined, I completed a self-study security certification course and saved my company millions when I thwarted hackers from accessing customer accounts.

Q: How about this one: Do you get along with less-experienced co-workers?

A: My teammates not only like me, they turn to me for technical knowledge and advice. I coordinate the IT department’s lunch-and-learn training sessions, which saved the company more than $65,000 in tuition last year.

Q: Yes, I’m on a roll. Let’s try the next one: Things change quickly around here; are you adaptable?

A: I’ve bonded with two different CIOs in the past three years while many of my junior  counterparts left the company. And when the company downsized, I volunteered to manage two outsourced vendors in addition to my other projects. I know how to deal with change.

Q: I know you’ve heard this one before. You seem overqualified; I’m not sure we can afford you.

A: Respectfully, I don’t think you can afford to pass me by. I’m the top coder in my unit and I make the fewest errors. I help out my boss and I basically manage myself. I do the work of two people, which really makes me a bargain, when you stop to think about it.

I’m Cat Miller, this has been DiceTV, and we now return you to your regular desktop.

DiceTV: How to Fight the 'Overqualified' Label in Interviews

Comments

6 Responses to “DiceTV: How to Fight the ‘Overqualified’ Label in Interviews”

August 11, 2010 at 3:41 am, Josephine Hanan said:

This very entertaining segment has some really great, specific, insights into responsing to the issue of being overqualified/ageism. I would love to see you do a video on the flip side about how to respond to not getting a job becuase you feel underqualified/inexperienced/etc.
P.s. The mustache is hysterical:)

Reply

August 11, 2010 at 3:41 am, Josephine Hanan said:

This very entertaining segment has some really great, specific, insights into responsing to the issue of being overqualified/ageism. I would love to see you do a video on the flip side about how to respond to not getting a job becuase you feel underqualified/inexperienced/etc.
P.s. The mustache is hysterical:)

Reply

August 19, 2010 at 12:53 am, Peter from Mesa said:

Very entertaining. However, how about some worthwhile suggestions regarding how to overcome the “overqualified” problem?

Reply

August 19, 2010 at 12:53 am, Peter from Mesa said:

Very entertaining. However, how about some worthwhile suggestions regarding how to overcome the “overqualified” problem?

Reply

August 19, 2010 at 9:46 am, Duderonemy said:

Thanks for being entertaining Cat, of course we all already know what she and pretty much every resume and interview advice columnist tells us: be the most f*ing awesome kick a** employee the world has ever known and you too can actually get a job.
Hiring managers need to get their heads out of the clouds apparently.

The real deal with overqualified is that a person is trying to get a job that pays way less than it appears the person should be able to make, thus the employer doesn’t want to hire the person for fear the person will quit shortly thereafter and/or insist on taking over. It’s what happens before market forces drive down the price of that person’s services. So, it’s either make $60K a year or nothing at all. A person who can’t quite cut it on the high end is left with no job at all. What to do about that? Any advice for people who have actual problems? Didn’t think so.

Reply

August 19, 2010 at 9:46 am, Duderonemy said:

Thanks for being entertaining Cat, of course we all already know what she and pretty much every resume and interview advice columnist tells us: be the most f*ing awesome kick a** employee the world has ever known and you too can actually get a job.
Hiring managers need to get their heads out of the clouds apparently.

The real deal with overqualified is that a person is trying to get a job that pays way less than it appears the person should be able to make, thus the employer doesn’t want to hire the person for fear the person will quit shortly thereafter and/or insist on taking over. It’s what happens before market forces drive down the price of that person’s services. So, it’s either make $60K a year or nothing at all. A person who can’t quite cut it on the high end is left with no job at all. What to do about that? Any advice for people who have actual problems? Didn’t think so.

Reply

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