The DiceTV References Quiz

 

The Script

Oh, I see, well thank you for calling.

Wow, I didn’t get the job. It seemed like everything was going so well, until I – provided my list of references. You know, I thought my ex bosses and professors would be willing to vouch for me. Maybe I should have reached out to them first. Hm.

I’m Cat Miller and this is DiceTV.

Boy, I should really think through how I handle references before my next interview. Okay. Pop quiz. First question. True or false: There’s no need to contact a former boss before adding his name to your reference list. I say true.

Oops.

Protocol dictates that candidates should ask permission before listing a former boss as a reference. Besides if your former boss is expecting a call, she’ll respond right away – demonstrating you have a rapport with your former manager. That will separate you from the competition.

Gee, thanks, Rolan.

Okay. Permission is the polite thing to do. Okay another… Um…

Most companies have a policy limiting the information managers can provide about former employees. True!

Oops.

Although many companies have a policy, managers still have the autonomy to provide references for former employees. If it’s been a while since you worked together, it may be difficult for your manager to recall your previous duties. So always send him a copy of your current resume, and review the new job requirements to help him prepare for the call. If he seems reluctant to recommend you, ask why he’s hesitant. If in doubt, offer the names
of colleagues who are willing to speak on your behalf.

Okay. Another one. Umm… I bet reference checks are usually conducted by HR staff or recruiters, and they don’t ask many technical questions.

Many employers hire outside firms to conduct detailed reference checks on IT candidates. They’ll verify the information on the candidate’s resume and ask about their technical expertise. Always represent your skills, certifications and experience accurately.  Employers have stepped up their technical due diligence.

Okay. One more

Be prudent about picking references. You don’t want your contacts to be bombarded with requests. Definitely true.

Finally.

Always have a number of references, so you can strategically pair them with prospective employers – and spread out the requests. Remember to send them a thank you note, or  show your appreciation by buying them lunch once you land a new job. That way, they’ll help you out in the future, too.

Boy, I’ve got to go easier on myself with these quizzes.

I’m Cat Miller, this has been DiceTV, and we now return you to your regular desktop.

Comments

4 Responses to “The DiceTV References Quiz”

June 03, 2010 at 1:26 am, Boston said:

I would prefer recruting firms to request references after the interviews. I usually don’t want to wear out my references for every job inquiry unless it is moving into a hiring decision or getting serious about an offer. Some recruting agencies request references **BEFORE** deciding to present a candidate to a company. I have to contact my references for every inquiry so that they don’t get a cold call.

Reply

June 03, 2010 at 1:26 am, Boston said:

I would prefer recruting firms to request references after the interviews. I usually don’t want to wear out my references for every job inquiry unless it is moving into a hiring decision or getting serious about an offer. Some recruting agencies request references **BEFORE** deciding to present a candidate to a company. I have to contact my references for every inquiry so that they don’t get a cold call.

Reply

June 03, 2010 at 10:20 am, MattyMat said:

Wow— this information seems to be stating the obvious, but if you’re new to the job seeking market, VERY important information.

Reply

June 03, 2010 at 10:20 am, MattyMat said:

Wow— this information seems to be stating the obvious, but if you’re new to the job seeking market, VERY important information.

Reply

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