New England Tech Companies Have Job Openings – But Not People to Fill Them

Tech companies in New England are having a tough time filling their job
openings. Why? Here’s what some of them told Mass High Tech.

James English, President and chief technical officer, Energid Technologies Corp.: Toughest position to fill: Tough jobs to fill are those that require domain-specific expertise in addition to robotics engineering knowledge. Domain examples would be medicine and nuclear power. Also in high demand is a combination of programming prowess and robotics-specific skills. Our primary programming language is C++, but others are in demand too.

Ed Godin, senior vice president of human resources, Brightcove Inc.:Toughest position to fill: Our most challenging position to fill remains the product manager role. We’re finding that many recent graduates or entry-level candidates have never even heard of the product manager role. And those that do find work early in their career as a product manager have a tendency to get pigeonholed by the product or industry they are working in.

Tom Clancy, VP of education services, EMC Corp.: Toughest position to fill: We’re seeing a growing need for highly skilled information storage and management professionals, one that’s becoming more acute in the face of pervasive technology evolution happening today in areas such as virtualization and cloud computing. We’re finding information storage and management skills are in short supply, partly due to a skills gap in areas such as math and science and the absence of formal information management and storage education and certification in the marketplace.

Sonia R. Lelii

Comments

10 Responses to “New England Tech Companies Have Job Openings – But Not People to Fill Them”

April 07, 2010 at 10:49 am, Steve said:

I do not want to work again in corporate america. I started my own company that cannot be outsourced. Unless they can figure out how to get L1/H1’s to shimmy up ladders and work in sometimes uncomfortable positions. It is still tech work just on the local level providing a much needed technology solution to a underserved market. I think my fellow MBA’s would call it a nitch market. Oh well, that is where your brain power went america. Ringing the bell at Walmart or starting up their own companies to compete with yours. Live long and prosper!

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April 07, 2010 at 10:49 am, Steve said:

I do not want to work again in corporate america. I started my own company that cannot be outsourced. Unless they can figure out how to get L1/H1’s to shimmy up ladders and work in sometimes uncomfortable positions. It is still tech work just on the local level providing a much needed technology solution to a underserved market. I think my fellow MBA’s would call it a nitch market. Oh well, that is where your brain power went america. Ringing the bell at Walmart or starting up their own companies to compete with yours. Live long and prosper!

Reply

April 15, 2010 at 5:32 am, Kevin said:

< < Sounds to me like employers need to redefine their requirements>>
You hit the nail. I have been looking for work as a web developer for a while and many of the job requirements are written up as follows: web developer needed with 3-5 years experience with (lets say Adobe Coldfusion), must also know Java, SQL, C++ asp.net, PHP…..Heck it takes a couple years, at a minimum, just to get a language down, and thats not counting the time it takes to actually become a good programmer who understands requirements gathering and creating and documenting objects properly so they can be re-used. These goofballs say things like 3-5 years experience, but when you look into what they really require of you, your talking 10-15 years of experience to be able to do what they expect of you.

Reply

April 15, 2010 at 5:32 am, Kevin said:

< < Sounds to me like employers need to redefine their requirements>>
You hit the nail. I have been looking for work as a web developer for a while and many of the job requirements are written up as follows: web developer needed with 3-5 years experience with (lets say Adobe Coldfusion), must also know Java, SQL, C++ asp.net, PHP…..Heck it takes a couple years, at a minimum, just to get a language down, and thats not counting the time it takes to actually become a good programmer who understands requirements gathering and creating and documenting objects properly so they can be re-used. These goofballs say things like 3-5 years experience, but when you look into what they really require of you, your talking 10-15 years of experience to be able to do what they expect of you.

Reply

April 15, 2010 at 8:50 am, Susan said:

I find it very difficult to believe that companies in any region of the country cannot find “good” candidates. Sounds to me like employers need to redefine their requirements rather than wondering what happened to the talent pool (although Steve makes a great point regarding where at least a portion of that went). Job listings often have requirements for which no one could claim total expertise. Besides, if a product manager candidate gets pigeonholed, whose fault is that — the job seeker’s or the industry’s? And don’t ignore the long-term unemployed just because you don’t like the outmoded notion of a hole in a resume. They’ve been looking as hard as they can for months, and may not have had the capital to start their own businesses.

Reply

April 15, 2010 at 8:50 am, Susan said:

I find it very difficult to believe that companies in any region of the country cannot find “good” candidates. Sounds to me like employers need to redefine their requirements rather than wondering what happened to the talent pool (although Steve makes a great point regarding where at least a portion of that went). Job listings often have requirements for which no one could claim total expertise. Besides, if a product manager candidate gets pigeonholed, whose fault is that — the job seeker’s or the industry’s? And don’t ignore the long-term unemployed just because you don’t like the outmoded notion of a hole in a resume. They’ve been looking as hard as they can for months, and may not have had the capital to start their own businesses.

Reply

April 15, 2010 at 8:52 am, Susan said:

I find it very difficult to believe that companies in any region of the country cannot find “good” candidates. Sounds to me like employers need to redefine their requirements rather than wondering what happened to the talent pool (although Steve makes a great point regarding where at least a portion of that went). Job listings often have requirements for which no one could claim total expertise. Besides, if a product manager candidate gets pigeonholed, whose fault is that — the job seeker’s or the industry’s? And please don’t ignore the long-term unemployed just because you don’t like the outmoded notion of a hole in a resume. They’ve been looking as hard as they can for months, and may not have had the capital to start their own businesses.

Reply

April 15, 2010 at 8:52 am, Susan said:

I find it very difficult to believe that companies in any region of the country cannot find “good” candidates. Sounds to me like employers need to redefine their requirements rather than wondering what happened to the talent pool (although Steve makes a great point regarding where at least a portion of that went). Job listings often have requirements for which no one could claim total expertise. Besides, if a product manager candidate gets pigeonholed, whose fault is that — the job seeker’s or the industry’s? And please don’t ignore the long-term unemployed just because you don’t like the outmoded notion of a hole in a resume. They’ve been looking as hard as they can for months, and may not have had the capital to start their own businesses.

Reply

April 17, 2010 at 12:28 am, Susan said:

I’m glad that someone agrees. Would you believe that some of the same requirements you list are not uncommon in ads for technical writers? And that’s in combination with the latest and greatest writing tools as well. I think the point here is that HR groups and hiring managers need to realize how acquired skills really can translate, particularly for tools and management. These things are not rocket science, and no one can keep up with everything out there. I realize my original post sounds a bit vitriolic, but a story framed to imply that the jobs are out there with no one to fill them really hit me viscerally.

Reply

April 17, 2010 at 12:28 am, Susan said:

I’m glad that someone agrees. Would you believe that some of the same requirements you list are not uncommon in ads for technical writers? And that’s in combination with the latest and greatest writing tools as well. I think the point here is that HR groups and hiring managers need to realize how acquired skills really can translate, particularly for tools and management. These things are not rocket science, and no one can keep up with everything out there. I realize my original post sounds a bit vitriolic, but a story framed to imply that the jobs are out there with no one to fill them really hit me viscerally.

Reply

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