Dice News Update: More Tech Jobs Require ‘Blended Skills’

More up and coming tech jobs require “blended skills…” Cisco’s doing some hiring… and kids from all over the country are showing the Air Force Association their stuff – and getting a taste of cyber security careers.

See last week’s update here.

Comments

17 Responses to “Dice News Update: More Tech Jobs Require ‘Blended Skills’”

February 20, 2010 at 3:32 am, Mike said:

I watched, I listened. There was precious little about “blending” but the text of the comment can be found at this blog: http://career-resources.dice.com/articles/content/entry/promising_demand_for_these_professionals. I was not aware that IT has not typically required service oriented skills. I’ve always had those skills but I’ve also known many in IT (some in management) who do not. Perhaps that explains why many IT workers and staffs are viewed as arrogant, condescending, unhelpful, etc.

Reply

February 24, 2010 at 3:36 am, Mark Leavitt said:

They want you know a string of blended skills but companies don’t want to pay for it. It’s ridicoulus. How many other fields do this and get away with it– not many.

Reply

February 25, 2010 at 12:16 am, Mark Feffer said:

@Jason: Yeah, I know. I had to keep checking notes off my laptop, which my colleague Adam was holding up for me to glance at. Nice as the weather was, we weren’t shooting in ideal conditions.

Reply

February 25, 2010 at 3:37 am, michael massetti said:

hello all
perhaps its the blended noise…..

monotone voice que card reading problem.

lets try this….

flodida scene :indoors (no noise) background

speaker; blended shirt(get it) blended area people
alot less noisey …
the speaker starts his monologe…

i’ll check on his next segment.

miss cat miller i have more trust in her approach at this time.
please do not play with cat miller you will loose a lot of people on dice tv.

Reply

February 25, 2010 at 7:29 am, Pseudo Nym said:

Mike’s comment: Perhaps that explains why many IT workers and staffs are viewed as arrogant, condescending, unhelpful, etc.

Rebuttal: IT workers are arrogant; translated is an end-user’s dismal attitude toward technology in general. Don’t mistake our competence for your own cerebral sloth.

Rebuttal: IT workers are condescending; translated is our utter disbelief that an end-user cannot accomplish a simple task after being shown repeatedly for weeks. Do you tie your own shoes (oh wait … you wear something you can slip your feet into because you FORGOT to tie your shoes … AGAIN).

Rebuttal: IT workers are unhelpful; translated means we aren’t staffed to provide a one-man help desk to every single end-user. The 80 / 20 rules applies here and you’re part of the 80 percent. Try reading or learning something new in between surfing the web during working hours.

I bet my money that Mike is an end-user and I’m not sorry if you’re offended (you should be).

Sincerely,

An IT Professional

Reply

February 25, 2010 at 7:56 am, R.O. Radiko said:

So in a nutshell, they’re looking to hire the “younger crowd” to work at Cisco and other places, that already have cybersecurity certs and network security experience already under their belts.

No explanation given what “blended skills” are in the video report, even though it’s in the title.

Since this is a jobless recession where employers call all the shots, I imagine ‘blended skills’ means they’re looking for super-multi-taskers with a mix of combined I.T. skills and customer service, willing to work for cheap. All in the name of military-style, national security I.T. measures, of course.

You know the neo-con mantra they expect of American labor: “DO MORE.. WITH LESS!” In this case — since G.W. Bush’s costly Iraq War is still going on — we could say ‘blended skills’ in this context, means “DO MORE, I.T. PROFESSIONALS… OR WE WILL REPORT YOU TO THE AUTHORITIES!”

B^)

Reply

February 25, 2010 at 9:12 am, Johan said:

Did I just watch a three minute commercial for Cisco? How much did you guys get paid for mentioning their name so many times? You certainly didn’t say anything else of any value.

What a complete waste of time!

Reply

February 25, 2010 at 9:30 am, dmr said:

I have blended skills and it has basically gotten me nowhere in landing a position. I think it confuses the hiring manager when they read your resume with all the tasks you have performed. I was considered an IT Analyst at my previous job because it consisted of programming, business analyst, tester, change and release analyst, product adminstrator and project manager whenever it was necessary. Having an analyst learn all these tasks as part of their job as a programmer saves some companies money to avoid hiring extra people to fill those roles. At least 50% of the entire department I worked within satisfied all of these roles as their job and they all started out as programmers/developers. Larger companies (which are the only ones really hiring now) still want the “specialized” person to fill each role. So it just depends on what you did and how you can fulfill that role. It can be more difficult to get the position.

Reply

February 25, 2010 at 10:29 am, Bobby said:

When the headline includes a quoted term or phrase, it’s incumbent upon the piece to define it. I’m considered intelligent by many standards and I can surmise the definition, however, I have been wrong in the past when it relates to technology terms. The definition of a seemingly ubiquitous term is often quite different in the technology sector.

As the previous comment alludes, shrouding a term or phrase in mystery prevents others from understanding it and keeps these arrogant types in their own special realm. Transparency is unnerving to many. Come out from behind the curtain and reveal yourself! You’ll still be the expert you’ve always been.

Reply

February 25, 2010 at 10:38 am, Mark Feffer said:

@Johan: no, this wasn’t a commercial for Cisco – and they didn’t pay us anything. We thought their hiring plans were interesting and could be a clue of things to come.

@Bobby: My mistake. As @Mike pointed out, you can find more information in the link he posted. I’ve fixed the link in the blurb above. Sorry about that.

Reply

February 25, 2010 at 11:37 am, Jason said:

Where’s Cat? Mark, your eyes stayed glued to your left. Were you reading this from a queue card?

Reply

February 25, 2010 at 11:40 am, Greg said:

How might one get these “blended” skills?

Reply

February 26, 2010 at 7:10 am, Mike said:

I agree with those viewpoints opposed to “blended skills” being the “silver bullet” solution to landing a position in IT. Basically, if you read the job postings that require the laundry list of latest tools, plus be an all-in-one programmer-tester-systems analyst-business systems analyst-project manager/task manager, the years of experience that reads “2-5 years” is the tip that the company is stingy with pay. So, one must have seen the entire IT world in 5 years?

Those companies which will never fill the posts above will inevitably whine for more H1 talent or shop the tasks offshore.

Creative cost-cutting, but the enterprise lacks creative innovation and as an employee you will always be worried about the next round of job cutbacks.

Reply

February 26, 2010 at 10:28 am, Paul said:

Some of these responses are kind of harsh. This isn’t a national news show, so a little wind, some note-checking and other distractions are to be expected. Oh wait, that also happens in national news too. Well, doesn’t matter. I think every little tidbit of information helps. Thanks for the report! As for some of the responses, they are so detail-oriented! Which is probably why many of you are good at what you do! Unfortunately, good techs are trained to notice more of what’s wrong with something, than what’s right. Which is probably why some do seem the way Mike described in the beginning.

Reply

March 01, 2010 at 4:48 am, Jim Markey said:

You can add the term “Blended Skills” to “think outside the box’, “level set expectations”, “do your due diligence”, etc. etc. ad nauseum, to the latest set of
management moonies whose only objective is to make themselves look good by obfuscation.

Reply

March 02, 2010 at 9:45 am, Annie said:

I find this amazing that these young people learn so much business.

Reply

March 09, 2010 at 3:55 am, Mike said:

PsuedoNym’s post (contains rebuttal to mine):

Mike’s comment: Perhaps that explains why many IT workers and staffs are viewed as arrogant, condescending, unhelpful, etc. Rebuttal: IT workers are arrogant; translated is an end-user’s dismal attitude toward technology in general. Don’t mistake our competence for your own cerebral sloth. Rebuttal: IT workers are condescending; translated is our utter disbelief that an end-user cannot accomplish a simple task after being shown repeatedly for weeks. Do you tie your own shoes (oh wait … you wear something you can slip your feet into because you FORGOT to tie your shoes … AGAIN). Rebuttal: IT workers are unhelpful; translated means we aren’t staffed to provide a one-man help desk to every single end-user. The 80 / 20 rules applies here and you’re part of the 80 percent. Try reading or learning something new in between surfing the web during working hours. I bet my money that Mike is an end-user and I’m not sorry if you’re offended (you should be). Sincerely, An IT Professional

***************************************************************

If you are betting money I am an end-user, you lose. I am a 25 year IT professional who end-users loved because I understood my job and how it related to their job. I am betting money you are one of the holier-than-thou-I-hate-end-users-and-I-am-so-smart IT “professionals”. It’s guys (or are you a girl?) like you that give IT a bad rep.

Reply

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published.