No Experience? You Can Still Get the Job

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You hear about it a lot: Employers want job seekers who have the right experience, but you can’t get the experience if someone doesn’t hire you for the right job. In this week’s Dice News Hangout, Sharadon Smith of the Nova Job Center in Sunnyvale, Calif., and Dice Software Engineering Community Guide Catherine Powell look at how both job seekers fresh out of college and those trying to change their career path can break the cycle.

Dice News Hangouts


8 Responses to “No Experience? You Can Still Get the Job”

January 31, 2014 at 8:34 am, Warren said:

Lets look at a high tech company like Crestron Electronics.
Four pages of job listings. Intern to experienced.
Looks great. Now drill down into corporate culture and employment.
It’s churn and burn, and if you stay till age 40, then watch your back.


February 01, 2014 at 5:47 am, oregon111 said:

they are ALL like that — age old advice — keep your head down on the grindstone…
if you try to be part of the “in crowd” — they will rip the flesh off your bones

just keep going to QA with coded projects — the real brains of the operation know who the posers are


January 31, 2014 at 5:49 pm, Spencer Forbes said:

I am actually in this exact situation right now. I graduate in May with a BS in Computer Security/Information Assurance and I’m starting my job hunt now. However, I have no real world experience working in IT and I can see that it’s hurting me now. Trying to find something considered ‘entry level’ seems pretty rare (at least in my area) and with relocation assistance far and few between it becomes even harder. This video though gave me a few new ideas on what to do to better my job hunt for when I graduate, thank you!


February 01, 2014 at 5:48 am, oregon111 said:

you should start by looking at what skills are in demand — go from there


February 01, 2014 at 5:29 am, oregon111 said:

I’ll throw in my 2 cents: I worked on mostly older stuff for a decade then took 2 years of classes in the new things and did an internship where I built a website for a small business

take a look at it if you like – its still up —

long story short — it wasn’t enough to get a job – so now I am halfway done getting my CS degree in modern and relevant software

take my advice! it is HARD out there to find IT work — go all the way with an UP TO DATE 4 yr degree — or do yourself a favor — and get out of IT

IT just does not need any entry level programmers — all that is done in India

find a trade — like plumbing — you will be happier — and toilets don’t change every 6 months


February 01, 2014 at 5:38 am, oregon111 said:

another comment: for those of you getting or have a CS degree w/ no experience…

how well do you know your stuff??? Did you “master” it, or did you “get by”?

If you have it all down and you know your stuff, you should be OK.
Go work for anybody for any price or no money at all — but work using your chosen technology stack that you will use to compete with in the open marketplace.

If you don’t know it like the back of your hand – you are of no use to anybody. Well over half the people in my classes are like that — always complaining about how they have “no time” to learn the material — they are learning nothing and wasting their time and money

IT is competition: the best only need apply – so be the best …

and in your interviews, show them that you know more than they do – challenge them – they like that — but also show that you can be humble and take direction


February 06, 2014 at 1:59 pm, Tom said:

No secret that it’s tough out there in the IT biz, but it’s that way in every industry right now. Spoke with a guy the other day who was hiring for 2 positions for an entry-level PC tech position, and had over 400 applicants. Lots of people looking for jobs, so tune up your skills and try something new – look for opportunities to volunteer, might open some doors for you. Be creative and look for ways to meet new people, networking has always been the best way for me.


February 08, 2014 at 12:21 pm, Mikey Mo. said:

My advice (from someone still out of work) is to build a website. That’s concrete proof that you understand programming. I’m astounded how many aspiring programmers have never even tried to build a site. The other is to get certification. Companies are required to have a certain number of certified staffers. The quest itself is a worthwhile endeavor.


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