Resume Heat Maps

Resume Heat Maps

Image: The Ladders

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5 Responses to “Resume Heat Maps”

January 17, 2013 at 1:47 pm, George said:

I don’t see much difference in the color scheme between the two examples. It’s also too small and blurry to read what the subject is actually looking at. What I see is that the location of what the recruiter is looking for (approximately a third of the way from the top of the page) is what they are looking for.

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January 22, 2013 at 11:47 pm, jdm said:

Could you home-in on the hotspots? I’d like what words caught the reader’s attention.

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January 23, 2013 at 9:13 am, David Strom said:

Sadly, I don’t have access to a higher-res picture. I would love to know this as well!

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October 24, 2014 at 6:52 pm, Rick said:

Wow. If the recruiters are only interested in looking at the top portion of the first page — where your most recent position will be described — does that indicate that you shouldn’t expect to be attempting anything other than a parallel move. If they’re looking for career progression, they need to be looking at the bottom of the page (and the second page as well), no? Between ATS software that knocks most candidates’ resumes out of contention and recruiters that are spending only a few seconds glancing (you can hardly call it reading) at a printed resume it’s a wonder anyone ever gets hired.

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June 17, 2015 at 4:43 pm, Mark said:

Don’t be silly! Recruiters need to know the last job you worked so they can gauge what you might be interested in and capable of doing in your next job. It has nothing to do with making a lateral move, but understanding the logical career progression. Moreover, the 6-second scan is only the first pass at the resume – the time when we disqualify most candidates. The remaining “keepers” will get the deeper look.

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