How to Use a Coding Portfolio [DiceTV]

DiceTV Coding Portfolio

Hiring managers need to know you can write code well, understand how to work on a team, use source control, and that you can design and maintain code you haven’t written. In other words, they want to see your work. That’s your true resume – a coding portfolio. Here’s how to put it together…

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12 Responses to “How to Use a Coding Portfolio [DiceTV]”

June 29, 2012 at 2:58 am, Cat Miller said:

Hey everyone, leave me comments about your WORST review stories ever! I want to hear the immature to the inappropriate to the downright scandalous! You all know you have some, so share there with me! May the “best” story win!

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June 29, 2012 at 10:50 am, Emil said:

“WORST review stories ever!” Isn’t that supposed to be confidential?!
There are plenty of bad stories, maybe bad job search stories are not any confidential, plus the Dept of Labor may learn something from them…
If you haven’t pointed any serious recent job experience from the US in the last 2-3 years, that’s considered like the worst scenario by many IT employers at present. Is this helpful?

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June 29, 2012 at 5:56 pm, cheer up sunny said:

So is DICE for me if I know nothing about code, but am willing to learn? I only know minor stuff but I am a hard worker.

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July 01, 2012 at 12:02 am, Dawn Kawamoto said:

Hi GrimGirl,

You are definitely on right track by willing to learn. In talking to a range of hiring managers, a common theme keeps coming up and its a desire to hire people who are passionate learners. These are folks who are willing to learn a new language for the seer desire of wanting to understand it and willing to spend their free time mastering it. So, show off your “minor stuff” and, better yet, the improvements you make to your “minor stuff” as you learn more and retool it.

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July 04, 2012 at 8:26 pm, RMS said:

There are many un/der employed “boomers” with the demonstrated ability to learn one language after another who cannot even schedule an interview. Are these hiring managers seeking them, or are they seeking MEllenials who claim to be “passionate learners” who know perhaps only Java?

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July 04, 2012 at 8:23 pm, RMS said:

“Hiring managers need to know you can write code well, understand how to work on a team, use source control, and that you can design and maintain code you haven’t written. In other words, they want to see your work.”

How will a portfolio show your ability to work on a team? If you have never held a programming job, how will you produce a portfolio? Will you load a GIT (and does anyone understand that GIT is British slang for “silly, incompetent, stupid, annoying, or childish”?) account with variations of “Hello world”? Perhaps a client/server written in “C”? How does your portfolio demonstrate your ability to sift through hundreds, if not thousands, of lines of code you did not write and isolate a problem?

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July 05, 2012 at 4:18 pm, JT said:

Hmmmm it seems that the request for programmers to know more has increase two or threefold, but where’s the pay? I checked a job that essentially wants A PROGRAMMER to be the whole team. Companies have very unreasonable expectations with that, programmer pay should start around 200k if I’m going to be the entire tech team.

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July 05, 2012 at 5:25 pm, Emil said:

I would like to read stories of folks who recently got new IT jobs…
Thanks!

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July 06, 2012 at 9:36 am, RN said:

I was once told I’d be thrown out a window for writing an incorrect piece of SQL code.

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July 07, 2012 at 3:31 pm, dude said:

Loved the “I bleed code” segment… You should do more of these acting scenarios. You’re a natural.

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July 07, 2012 at 3:53 pm, dude said:

Worst Review Story (not really, but kind of funny): It was back in the early 1980’s. I was working in the Silicon Valley at a software/consulting firm as a software engineer. I was new to the company and, due to an employee recently leaving, I was asked if I wanted to move to her now vacant work area (near the middle of the team) or stay where I was (just a little outside the team area, but within view). The team tended to be chatty, and I worked best when not interrupted with idle conversation, so I chose to remain where I was. Many months later when I received my performance evaluation my manager informed me that I “chose the wrong seating area which indicated I was not a team player.” In addition, he also cited the fact that on Monday mornings I never once asked him “how his weekend was” as further proof that I was not a team player. I just sat there and shook my head in disbelief… Of course my manager failed to mention the many times I worked with the team to help resolve various issues throughout the year.

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