CIOs: What I Really Want to Do is Virtualize

Virtual Machines

If you came to Interop and you didn’t think the cloud and virtualization were big deals, then you were somewhere else. You simply couldn’t get away from the discussion. At CIO Boot Camp, which runs during Interop, I spoke with three IT leaders who were at different levels of virtualization within their organization:

  • Steve King, VP, Management Information Systems of the Housing Authority of the City of Tulsa, has about half of his organization’s infrastructure virtualized. It’s mostly things that weren’t mission critical and easy to ramp up, like printer hosting.
  • Anthony Salazar, Senior Manager, Network Services of Square Enix, has about 75 to 80 percent of his servers virtualized. While virtualization is great for disaster recovery, Salazar is trying to figure out what his company’s needs for virtualization will be in the future.
  • Lastly, Lance Tinseth, Director of Information Technology for Murdoch’s Ranch and Home Supply, has plans to virtualize his entire infrastructure.

All three have been really happy and surprised with the success of virtualization.

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No Responses to “CIOs: What I Really Want to Do is Virtualize”

July 04, 2011 at 11:56 am, Mike said:

If everything is virtualized, I assume to reduce the amount of hardware, what happens if the hardware fails? Companies will still need redundancy, no?

If all your “stuff” is in the clouds, does that not increase your potential for “loss”? What if the cloud is inaccessible? What if the cloud owner decides to hold your stuff hostage for a better payout?

I believe that sometimes “new” is being pursued simply because it is new, not necessarily better.

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July 04, 2011 at 6:46 pm, David Spark said:

All of these questions you ask were definitely issues that were discussed. I think holding your data hostage would definitely be grounds for a massive lawsuit. I don’t think that’s happened. But data portability, and service portability is something the cloud can’t offer. They keep referring to themselves as a “utility” but you can’t just have a different cloud provider like you can have a different phone provider.

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July 05, 2011 at 5:50 am, Mike said:

Agreed.

Additionally, if your apps and data are cloud based you will (probably) have no choice but to use the “latest and greatest” as your provider sees fit, rather than continue with what you know works until the latest-and-greatest has been proven.

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