Opportunities Supporting IBM’s Mainframes. Yes, Mainframes

There are remarkable opportunities for savvy techs to work on systems that have gone out of fashion. The average age of a tech who works in the IBM mainframe market is between 55 and 60, yet 10,000 mainframes are being used in as many as 5,000 companies.

This is a pretty serious problem at IBM’s Armonk, N.Y., facility, where the chips and servers are manufactured. The company has aggressively set to make the mainframe sexy again. Among other things, Big Blue is offering a discounted training program ($350) which, no matter how you poke it, is a great deal.

Consider that a five-day security or Windows 7 Deployment class in New York now goes for $3,200. IBM’s offering three months of unlimited access to 55 comprehensive System Z courses through its e-learning portal. The objective: to Keep legacy systems running so the company can fend off HP and Dell in the world of networks and Web applications.

Even if you don’t support one of these systems, the training can create a nice bullet on your resume. When you’re in your mid-20s and sit across from a hiring manager who cut his teeth on mainframes, and you can share some command line war stories. You may get a much better chance than the applicant who only knows his way around a mouse.

— Dino Londis 

Comments

201 Responses to “Opportunities Supporting IBM’s Mainframes. Yes, Mainframes”

September 16, 2010 at 12:01 am, William J. Smith said:

The mainframe is a fresh, new, vibrant and technologically leading edge as it ever was with the new z/Enterprise. It trumps ANYTHING in the distributed market space for energy efficiency, footprint, availability, performance, and virtualization. No, I don’t work for IBM. Mainframe jobs aren’t abundant, but the work is there if you look for it. Few people realize that UNIX runs as a subsytem of z/OS, and Linux runs both natively and as a virtual operating system on System z. You get everything on one platform. Why go elsewhere? Just because you are a mainframer does NOT preclude developing distributed workstation skills and certification.
Why leave System z? Because people STAY in those jobs for years: One takes years to become proficient, mature, and technically outstanding with both breadth and depth of knowlege on so many products, subsystems, and platforms. The skills one develops on System z are easily ported elsewhere. NOTHING in the marketplace matches System z for the best of the best in technology, sophistication, and cutting edge computing horsepower. It RUNS the Fortune 1,000, the US Government, and z/TPF another System z operating system – runs the airlines!

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:01 am, William J. Smith said:

The mainframe is a fresh, new, vibrant and technologically leading edge as it ever was with the new z/Enterprise. It trumps ANYTHING in the distributed market space for energy efficiency, footprint, availability, performance, and virtualization. No, I don’t work for IBM. Mainframe jobs aren’t abundant, but the work is there if you look for it. Few people realize that UNIX runs as a subsytem of z/OS, and Linux runs both natively and as a virtual operating system on System z. You get everything on one platform. Why go elsewhere? Just because you are a mainframer does NOT preclude developing distributed workstation skills and certification.
Why leave System z? Because people STAY in those jobs for years: One takes years to become proficient, mature, and technically outstanding with both breadth and depth of knowlege on so many products, subsystems, and platforms. The skills one develops on System z are easily ported elsewhere. NOTHING in the marketplace matches System z for the best of the best in technology, sophistication, and cutting edge computing horsepower. It RUNS the Fortune 1,000, the US Government, and z/TPF another System z operating system – runs the airlines!

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:03 am, AB said:

Working in the IBM Mainframe environment for 30+ years in development and system analysis. After 10+ months collecting unemployment benefits starting in September 2008, I got a contract assignment with a bank in CA and fortunately, still working. Never stoping looking for the next contract even while employed. Regarding the Mainframe employment prospect, the future is not that ‘rosy’ as claimed. Even if 5000 (?) companies are still using mainframes, the supporting staff is static and all new developments, whereas new demand, are in the front-end web-based platforms. The maiframers supporting these legacy applications will probably retire at the same time as I will. Bottom line, not that many vacancies out there for my ‘seasoned’ mainframers peers. Although being lucky to have a job, I am not very optomistic about the chance to get the next contract. Good luck to you all my dear mainframers.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:03 am, AB said:

Working in the IBM Mainframe environment for 30+ years in development and system analysis. After 10+ months collecting unemployment benefits starting in September 2008, I got a contract assignment with a bank in CA and fortunately, still working. Never stoping looking for the next contract even while employed. Regarding the Mainframe employment prospect, the future is not that ‘rosy’ as claimed. Even if 5000 (?) companies are still using mainframes, the supporting staff is static and all new developments, whereas new demand, are in the front-end web-based platforms. The maiframers supporting these legacy applications will probably retire at the same time as I will. Bottom line, not that many vacancies out there for my ‘seasoned’ mainframers peers. Although being lucky to have a job, I am not very optomistic about the chance to get the next contract. Good luck to you all my dear mainframers.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:03 am, William J. Smith said:

The mainframe is a fresh, new, vibrant and technologically leading edge as it ever was with the new z/Enterprise. It trumps ANYTHING in the distributed market space for energy efficiency, footprint, availability, performance, and virtualization. Mainframe jobs aren’t abundant, but the work is there if you look for it. Few people realize that UNIX runs as a subsytem of z/OS, and Linux runs both natively and as a virtual operating system on System z. You get everything on one platform. Why go elsewhere? Just because you are a mainframer does NOT preclude developing distributed workstation skills and certification. Because people STAY in those jobs for years: One takes years to become proficient, mature, and technically outstanding with both breadth and depth of knowlege on so many products, subsystems, and platforms. NOTHING in the marketplace matches System z for the best of the best in technology, sophistication, and cutting edge computing horsepower.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:03 am, William J. Smith said:

The mainframe is a fresh, new, vibrant and technologically leading edge as it ever was with the new z/Enterprise. It trumps ANYTHING in the distributed market space for energy efficiency, footprint, availability, performance, and virtualization. Mainframe jobs aren’t abundant, but the work is there if you look for it. Few people realize that UNIX runs as a subsytem of z/OS, and Linux runs both natively and as a virtual operating system on System z. You get everything on one platform. Why go elsewhere? Just because you are a mainframer does NOT preclude developing distributed workstation skills and certification. Because people STAY in those jobs for years: One takes years to become proficient, mature, and technically outstanding with both breadth and depth of knowlege on so many products, subsystems, and platforms. NOTHING in the marketplace matches System z for the best of the best in technology, sophistication, and cutting edge computing horsepower.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:05 am, AB said:

Working in the IBM Mainframe environment for 30+ years in development and system analysis. After 10+ months collecting unemployment benefits starting in September 2008, I got a contract assignment with a bank in CA and fortunately, still working. Never stoping looking for the next contract even while employed. Regarding the Mainframe employment prospect, the future is not that ‘rosy’ as claimed. Even if 5000 (?) companies are still using mainframes, the supporting staff is static and all new developments, whereas new demand, are in the front-end web-based platforms. The maiframers supporting these legacy applications will probably retire at the same time as I will. Bottom line, not that many vacancies out there for my ‘seasoned’ mainframers peers. Although being lucky to have a job, I am not very optomistic about the chance to get the next contract. Good luck to you all my dear mainframers.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:05 am, AB said:

Working in the IBM Mainframe environment for 30+ years in development and system analysis. After 10+ months collecting unemployment benefits starting in September 2008, I got a contract assignment with a bank in CA and fortunately, still working. Never stoping looking for the next contract even while employed. Regarding the Mainframe employment prospect, the future is not that ‘rosy’ as claimed. Even if 5000 (?) companies are still using mainframes, the supporting staff is static and all new developments, whereas new demand, are in the front-end web-based platforms. The maiframers supporting these legacy applications will probably retire at the same time as I will. Bottom line, not that many vacancies out there for my ‘seasoned’ mainframers peers. Although being lucky to have a job, I am not very optomistic about the chance to get the next contract. Good luck to you all my dear mainframers.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:05 am, Anthony said:

Guess my post was the first one accepted for publication after this piece was released this morning.
Thank you Bryan for supporting my initial post.
The reality of this situation is that even if IBM is making a commitment to the mainframe it doesn’t mean that American resources, newly trained or retooled will get jobs.
We live in a nation where we have political leadership that preaches about the need to create jobs, but at the same time doesn’t have the courage to stand up to companies right here in the states that offshore their work; and yes, including ‘Big Blue.’
From the White House to the individual state level, we think that ‘infrastructure jobs’ applies only to highways and bridges. What ever happened to our ‘technical infrastructure?’ Some of us former mainframe guys are in our mid-50’s and older. Yeah, I can see myself out working on a road crew sponsored by the ‘Workforce Investment Act.’
So for all those who want to link to training and/or links to jobs as a word of caution I’d suggest to tread carefully. Hypothetically if you did have the skills, and/or the training, and you found something, got an interview and were hired that immediately you’d be at risk. The risk of the offshore tidal wave than no one is trying to contain. When an American job is lost to an offshore entity it won’t be back. Think of the future friends, without manufacturing and all of our technical support jobs going elsewhere at a frightening rate, where will we be in as short of a time frame as 5 years from now?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:05 am, Anthony said:

Guess my post was the first one accepted for publication after this piece was released this morning.
Thank you Bryan for supporting my initial post.
The reality of this situation is that even if IBM is making a commitment to the mainframe it doesn’t mean that American resources, newly trained or retooled will get jobs.
We live in a nation where we have political leadership that preaches about the need to create jobs, but at the same time doesn’t have the courage to stand up to companies right here in the states that offshore their work; and yes, including ‘Big Blue.’
From the White House to the individual state level, we think that ‘infrastructure jobs’ applies only to highways and bridges. What ever happened to our ‘technical infrastructure?’ Some of us former mainframe guys are in our mid-50’s and older. Yeah, I can see myself out working on a road crew sponsored by the ‘Workforce Investment Act.’
So for all those who want to link to training and/or links to jobs as a word of caution I’d suggest to tread carefully. Hypothetically if you did have the skills, and/or the training, and you found something, got an interview and were hired that immediately you’d be at risk. The risk of the offshore tidal wave than no one is trying to contain. When an American job is lost to an offshore entity it won’t be back. Think of the future friends, without manufacturing and all of our technical support jobs going elsewhere at a frightening rate, where will we be in as short of a time frame as 5 years from now?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:19 am, Anthony said:

Even if IBM is making a commitment to the mainframe it doesn’t mean that American resources, newly trained or retooled will get jobs. Our political leadership preaches about job creation, yet at the same time lacks courage to stand up to companies here in the states that offshore their tech work, yes ‘Big Blue’ you too. The White House and state government believes that ‘infrastructure jobs’ are only highways and bridges. Whatever happened to our ‘technical infrastructure?’ Former mainframe guys like me are in our mid-50’s and older. I can just see myself out working on a road crew paid for by the ‘Workforce Investment Act.’ So a word of caution to those who got excited about this post. Even if you landed a mainframe slot the offshore tidal wave would sooner than later swallow you up. American tech jobs lost offshore will not come back. Nice future for our nation when we’ve lost both our manufacturing and technical support sectors. Can anyone spell catastrophe?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:19 am, Anthony said:

Even if IBM is making a commitment to the mainframe it doesn’t mean that American resources, newly trained or retooled will get jobs. Our political leadership preaches about job creation, yet at the same time lacks courage to stand up to companies here in the states that offshore their tech work, yes ‘Big Blue’ you too. The White House and state government believes that ‘infrastructure jobs’ are only highways and bridges. Whatever happened to our ‘technical infrastructure?’ Former mainframe guys like me are in our mid-50’s and older. I can just see myself out working on a road crew paid for by the ‘Workforce Investment Act.’ So a word of caution to those who got excited about this post. Even if you landed a mainframe slot the offshore tidal wave would sooner than later swallow you up. American tech jobs lost offshore will not come back. Nice future for our nation when we’ve lost both our manufacturing and technical support sectors. Can anyone spell catastrophe?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:22 am, Scott T. Harder said:

I’ve been working on IBM z/OS and VM mainframes since 1984. I lost my job at one of only two mainframe companies (sort of… emulated mainframe) in the Naples, FL area back in April of 2009 and have not been able to find even Windows work in this area; let alone mainframe work. I can walk in and make immediate impact, but I guess it will take relocation, which I can’t really afford without a pretty serious amount of assistance. Where are these jobs? I am ready and willing.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:22 am, Scott T. Harder said:

I’ve been working on IBM z/OS and VM mainframes since 1984. I lost my job at one of only two mainframe companies (sort of… emulated mainframe) in the Naples, FL area back in April of 2009 and have not been able to find even Windows work in this area; let alone mainframe work. I can walk in and make immediate impact, but I guess it will take relocation, which I can’t really afford without a pretty serious amount of assistance. Where are these jobs? I am ready and willing.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:24 am, GMan said:

If this is true at all . . . . . .
– as said previously there is no evidence in the text – the key phrase, I think, is “When you’re in your mid-20s…” . . . . . . .
Since any recent graduate with solid CS or EE or Web Dev training is in demand at a decent rate, this appears to be looking for people not in that category but who are willing to be low paid fodder at rates that compete with India. I hope they realize that they will end up spit-out and obsoleted, like most of the dedicated and experienced people who have posted here.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:24 am, GMan said:

If this is true at all . . . . . .
– as said previously there is no evidence in the text – the key phrase, I think, is “When you’re in your mid-20s…” . . . . . . .
Since any recent graduate with solid CS or EE or Web Dev training is in demand at a decent rate, this appears to be looking for people not in that category but who are willing to be low paid fodder at rates that compete with India. I hope they realize that they will end up spit-out and obsoleted, like most of the dedicated and experienced people who have posted here.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:27 am, Jim said:

The Link for the trainning is
http://www-304.ibm.com/jct03001c/services/learning/ites.wss/us/en?pageType=course_search&sortBy=5&searchType=1&sortDirection=9&includeNotScheduled=15&rowStart=0&rowsToReturn=20&maxSearchResults=200&language=en&country=us&searchString=EZ110

To all that posted complaints about outsourcing to other countries… quit complaining and support a candidate that will no longer support outsourcing to other countries without a hefty tax or penalties. Why do you think we are in a depression? Software development (Microsoft, IBM, etc.) and other good paying jobs are over in India and Malaysia. This country is supposed to be by the people for the people¿ so if you don¿t like what is going on do something about it! Call you congressmen, email your congressmen, and tell them you no longer want this outsourcing to occur! Quit complaining and do something!

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:27 am, Jim said:

The Link for the trainning is
http://www-304.ibm.com/jct03001c/services/learning/ites.wss/us/en?pageType=course_search&sortBy=5&searchType=1&sortDirection=9&includeNotScheduled=15&rowStart=0&rowsToReturn=20&maxSearchResults=200&language=en&country=us&searchString=EZ110

To all that posted complaints about outsourcing to other countries… quit complaining and support a candidate that will no longer support outsourcing to other countries without a hefty tax or penalties. Why do you think we are in a depression? Software development (Microsoft, IBM, etc.) and other good paying jobs are over in India and Malaysia. This country is supposed to be by the people for the people¿ so if you don¿t like what is going on do something about it! Call you congressmen, email your congressmen, and tell them you no longer want this outsourcing to occur! Quit complaining and do something!

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:27 am, Robin said:

Anthony, Dave, Bryan, and others who’ve been saying the same things — you are right on the mark. Yes, in spite of the supposed facts that many large organizations still use mainframes, the job opportunities for them are scarce. I’ve been out of work for over a year, and I’ve been retraining myself in newer technologies because that’s where the future is. I cannot tell you how frustrating it has been, knowing that your entire body of technical knowledge is basically worth zero in today’s job market. I keep hearing that 10 years from now, companies are going to be begging for mainframe programmers. Well, that’s great, but we need jobs now, not 10 years from now.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:27 am, Robin said:

Anthony, Dave, Bryan, and others who’ve been saying the same things — you are right on the mark. Yes, in spite of the supposed facts that many large organizations still use mainframes, the job opportunities for them are scarce. I’ve been out of work for over a year, and I’ve been retraining myself in newer technologies because that’s where the future is. I cannot tell you how frustrating it has been, knowing that your entire body of technical knowledge is basically worth zero in today’s job market. I keep hearing that 10 years from now, companies are going to be begging for mainframe programmers. Well, that’s great, but we need jobs now, not 10 years from now.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:29 am, GMan said:

(to moderator) please remove my erroneous assertion that “there is no evidence in the text”. Was the hot link added after the article was posted? In any event I didn’t see it at first. I stand by my main point.)

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:29 am, GMan said:

(to moderator) please remove my erroneous assertion that “there is no evidence in the text”. Was the hot link added after the article was posted? In any event I didn’t see it at first. I stand by my main point.)

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:37 am, Scott T. Harder said:

I’ve been working on IBM z/OS and VM mainframes since 1984. I lost my job at one of only two mainframe companies (sort of… emulated mainframe hardware; same software) in the Naples, FL area back in April of 2009 and have not been able to find even Windows work in this geographical area; let alone mainframe work. I can walk in and make immediate impact, but I guess it will take relocation, which I can’t really afford without a pretty serious amount of assistance. Where are these jobs? I am ready and willing to start. In addition to my z/OS system, security, and storage administration experience, I have tons of system automation experience, as well. Over the last 10+ years, my Windows experience in the same areas has also been expanded greatly; yet I cannot find work in any of my fields. I’m getting ready to go work for Mobile On-the-Run or something!

Very Frustrated,
Scott T. Harder

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 12:37 am, Scott T. Harder said:

I’ve been working on IBM z/OS and VM mainframes since 1984. I lost my job at one of only two mainframe companies (sort of… emulated mainframe hardware; same software) in the Naples, FL area back in April of 2009 and have not been able to find even Windows work in this geographical area; let alone mainframe work. I can walk in and make immediate impact, but I guess it will take relocation, which I can’t really afford without a pretty serious amount of assistance. Where are these jobs? I am ready and willing to start. In addition to my z/OS system, security, and storage administration experience, I have tons of system automation experience, as well. Over the last 10+ years, my Windows experience in the same areas has also been expanded greatly; yet I cannot find work in any of my fields. I’m getting ready to go work for Mobile On-the-Run or something!

Very Frustrated,
Scott T. Harder

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 1:24 am, NS said:

Many people miss the point of this article…
To sell you something…
Get the picture…buy more classes and you’ll get that job!! Oh, Really?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 1:24 am, NS said:

Many people miss the point of this article…
To sell you something…
Get the picture…buy more classes and you’ll get that job!! Oh, Really?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 1:26 am, Jim said:

Stop offshoring these jobs and you would have a pool of developers! But no, save a buck in the short term and loose out in the long term.

I will not go back to mainframes because they will eventually be outsourced!

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 1:26 am, Jim said:

Stop offshoring these jobs and you would have a pool of developers! But no, save a buck in the short term and loose out in the long term.

I will not go back to mainframes because they will eventually be outsourced!

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 1:31 am, Mark Feffer said:

@Winston: I just have to jump in for a minute to say this isn’t an ad masquerading as an article. Dino found this story and thought it was interesting, so he write it up and we posted it, with a link back to original newspaper article. We don’t write advertorials here at Dice, really.

Thanks,

Mark

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 1:31 am, Mark Feffer said:

@Winston: I just have to jump in for a minute to say this isn’t an ad masquerading as an article. Dino found this story and thought it was interesting, so he write it up and we posted it, with a link back to original newspaper article. We don’t write advertorials here at Dice, really.

Thanks,

Mark

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 4:23 am, Iron said:

Sorry Dice but IBM Armonk ISN’T ‘where the chips and servers are manufactured’. Armonk is an office complex – just like Somers.

The chip manufacturing you wrote of takes place in the East Fishkill fab plant at the junction of Lime Kiln Road and I-84. Take is from a Mid-Hudsoner wearing a ‘bunny suit’.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 4:23 am, Iron said:

Sorry Dice but IBM Armonk ISN’T ‘where the chips and servers are manufactured’. Armonk is an office complex – just like Somers.

The chip manufacturing you wrote of takes place in the East Fishkill fab plant at the junction of Lime Kiln Road and I-84. Take is from a Mid-Hudsoner wearing a ‘bunny suit’.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 4:24 am, Rupert Brown said:

Is anybody out there hiring maintenance techs for Gould 32/xx and Harris mainframe computer systems?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 4:24 am, Rupert Brown said:

Is anybody out there hiring maintenance techs for Gould 32/xx and Harris mainframe computer systems?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 4:29 am, Omar said:

At a Fortune 500 insurance company who is very profitable, our I/T dept was hit major outsourcing in April and July, and there are no jobs in the whole South Florida area as the rest of the major IBM shops down here have all outsourced. So, it looks to me like corporate execs salute the green and not the red, white and blue.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 4:29 am, Omar said:

At a Fortune 500 insurance company who is very profitable, our I/T dept was hit major outsourcing in April and July, and there are no jobs in the whole South Florida area as the rest of the major IBM shops down here have all outsourced. So, it looks to me like corporate execs salute the green and not the red, white and blue.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 5:20 am, Ross said:

Read the article in the “between 50 and 60″ link . 10,000 mainframes seems like alot, but there used to be 30,000 to 40,00 mainframes in use. The combination of offshoring mainframe jobs to India and other countries, hiring imported mainframe programmers from other countries in our local economies and the reduced number of mainframes in use means too many of us American 50 to 60 year olds are chasing too few mainframe jobs. Sad but true.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 5:20 am, Ross said:

Read the article in the “between 50 and 60″ link . 10,000 mainframes seems like alot, but there used to be 30,000 to 40,00 mainframes in use. The combination of offshoring mainframe jobs to India and other countries, hiring imported mainframe programmers from other countries in our local economies and the reduced number of mainframes in use means too many of us American 50 to 60 year olds are chasing too few mainframe jobs. Sad but true.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 5:42 am, Anthony said:

Not sure I truly agree with the post ‘Opportunities Supporting Mainframes’ Things were so abysmal in the IBM-I Market when my last position was eliminated last October that I retooled myself (after 30+ years in IT) and and started my own web development company.

In addition, as our government and larger organizations continue to freely dispense our technical jobs, many of which are indeed IBM Mainframe, ‘Midrange’ etc. to the offshore sector, us middle-age techs will find less and less opportunities. To prove my point, just search on any type of developer job; whether it be an analysis or programmer for the descendants of the now legacy ‘AS/400′ system and you will find the opportunities to be far and between.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 5:42 am, Anthony said:

Not sure I truly agree with the post ‘Opportunities Supporting Mainframes’ Things were so abysmal in the IBM-I Market when my last position was eliminated last October that I retooled myself (after 30+ years in IT) and and started my own web development company.

In addition, as our government and larger organizations continue to freely dispense our technical jobs, many of which are indeed IBM Mainframe, ‘Midrange’ etc. to the offshore sector, us middle-age techs will find less and less opportunities. To prove my point, just search on any type of developer job; whether it be an analysis or programmer for the descendants of the now legacy ‘AS/400′ system and you will find the opportunities to be far and between.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 5:45 am, Ray said:

I see it this way. If such demand exists how much will they pay ME, To take the training? If it’s so in demand then someone would be paying you to take that course or it would be required by colleges to teach it. I still think if You spend a lot for the computer then you should be ready to spend a lot for the best people to run them.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 5:45 am, Ray said:

I see it this way. If such demand exists how much will they pay ME, To take the training? If it’s so in demand then someone would be paying you to take that course or it would be required by colleges to teach it. I still think if You spend a lot for the computer then you should be ready to spend a lot for the best people to run them.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 6:01 am, Kingston Wong said:

If this was true, then IBM would not have laid me off 5 years ago. I spent 20+ years of my life servicing IBM main-frames.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 6:01 am, Kingston Wong said:

If this was true, then IBM would not have laid me off 5 years ago. I spent 20+ years of my life servicing IBM main-frames.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 6:28 am, Mario said:

Quick training programs are what the offshorers and H1-B’s used long ago to get so many jobs.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 6:28 am, Mario said:

Quick training programs are what the offshorers and H1-B’s used long ago to get so many jobs.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 7:24 am, Mikey Mainframe said:

“When you’re in your mid-20s and sit across from a hiring manager who cut his teeth on mainframes, and you can share some command line war stories.”
What kind of sentence is that? Someone needs a little grammar and writing training.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 7:24 am, Mikey Mainframe said:

“When you’re in your mid-20s and sit across from a hiring manager who cut his teeth on mainframes, and you can share some command line war stories.”
What kind of sentence is that? Someone needs a little grammar and writing training.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 7:27 am, WaitAndSee said:

I got laid off by a financial giant in 2007. This company made lots of temporary fixes for Y2K. (Remember that?). The fixes will fail in 2013. Can’t wait to see what they’re going to do.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 7:27 am, WaitAndSee said:

I got laid off by a financial giant in 2007. This company made lots of temporary fixes for Y2K. (Remember that?). The fixes will fail in 2013. Can’t wait to see what they’re going to do.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 7:30 am, WaitAndSee said:

I got laid off by a financial giant in 2007. This company made lots of temporary mainframe fixes for Y2K. (Remember that?). The fixes will fail in 2013. Can’t wait to see what they’re going to do.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 7:30 am, WaitAndSee said:

I got laid off by a financial giant in 2007. This company made lots of temporary mainframe fixes for Y2K. (Remember that?). The fixes will fail in 2013. Can’t wait to see what they’re going to do.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 7:32 am, Sandy said:

Guys, If you really feel that Mainframe Jobs have been off-shored to India… here is a thought. Why don’t you move to India? It is not such a far fetched idea. Specially if you are out of a job and struggling in the US of A and are 40+ and your kids have flown the nest. With your experience you would be treated like royalty. And health care is just fabulous. Think about it. India is not just about fakirs and snake charmers. Talk to your Indian neighbor. Get some facts. But the true test is … are Mainframe jobs in India? Here is a link to a reality check … I urge you to try your luck and wish you all the best.

http://indiacalling.shine.com

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 7:32 am, Sandy said:

Guys, If you really feel that Mainframe Jobs have been off-shored to India… here is a thought. Why don’t you move to India? It is not such a far fetched idea. Specially if you are out of a job and struggling in the US of A and are 40+ and your kids have flown the nest. With your experience you would be treated like royalty. And health care is just fabulous. Think about it. India is not just about fakirs and snake charmers. Talk to your Indian neighbor. Get some facts. But the true test is … are Mainframe jobs in India? Here is a link to a reality check … I urge you to try your luck and wish you all the best.

http://indiacalling.shine.com

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 7:43 am, Joe said:

Dino:,heh, er:

The mainframe ain’t command line unless you consider JCL command line. But, JCL is much more like a unix script than it’s like a command line. Most programmer work is done through SPF ( a green screen) or through a PC based GUI and then uploaded to the mainframe.
Oh, and it also does FTP and Web Servers and all those other neat things, it just doesn’t do them with an integrated GUI because the mainframe’s I/O is too busy pushing data at giga bytes per second to service human finger speed input.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 7:43 am, Joe said:

Dino:,heh, er:

The mainframe ain’t command line unless you consider JCL command line. But, JCL is much more like a unix script than it’s like a command line. Most programmer work is done through SPF ( a green screen) or through a PC based GUI and then uploaded to the mainframe.
Oh, and it also does FTP and Web Servers and all those other neat things, it just doesn’t do them with an integrated GUI because the mainframe’s I/O is too busy pushing data at giga bytes per second to service human finger speed input.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 7:58 am, Leo said:

Mainframe positions aren’t a plentiful as in the ’80s and ’90s. They are mainly maintenance work on legacy systems that have been around for decades. Just do a search for mainframe positions as against java positions.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 7:58 am, Leo said:

Mainframe positions aren’t a plentiful as in the ’80s and ’90s. They are mainly maintenance work on legacy systems that have been around for decades. Just do a search for mainframe positions as against java positions.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 8:00 am, Kevin Robbins said:

This is what I did in the ’80’s. I serviced System 3, Systems 34, 36, and 38, and the 43xx series. Even Series 1, and System 360 and 370. I even supported unit record equipment like 029, 059, 129, 083, and 519. In the nineties I moved into Netware and PC support and got of the mainframe support business, but I could easily jump back into it.

But where do I find these jobs? I’ve never seen any postings for mainframe service jobs.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 8:00 am, Kevin Robbins said:

This is what I did in the ’80’s. I serviced System 3, Systems 34, 36, and 38, and the 43xx series. Even Series 1, and System 360 and 370. I even supported unit record equipment like 029, 059, 129, 083, and 519. In the nineties I moved into Netware and PC support and got of the mainframe support business, but I could easily jump back into it.

But where do I find these jobs? I’ve never seen any postings for mainframe service jobs.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 8:00 am, Colby Dykes said:

So can we get a link in this article to the relevant training page at IBM?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 8:00 am, Colby Dykes said:

So can we get a link in this article to the relevant training page at IBM?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 8:05 am, GD said:

Could you provide a link for the discounted training? I’ve been searching the IBM website, but haven’t been able to find it.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 8:05 am, GD said:

Could you provide a link for the discounted training? I’ve been searching the IBM website, but haven’t been able to find it.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 8:23 am, Larry DesAutels said:

I cut my eyeteeth on IBM mainframes, particularly the 7070 when it was brand new, no systems delivered yet! I learned how to fix them as a systems tech, then also learned how to program them in several languages, including assemlers, FORTRAN, and COBOL.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 8:23 am, Larry DesAutels said:

I cut my eyeteeth on IBM mainframes, particularly the 7070 when it was brand new, no systems delivered yet! I learned how to fix them as a systems tech, then also learned how to program them in several languages, including assemlers, FORTRAN, and COBOL.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 8:29 am, Richard Strozewski said:

It is about time. I thought I might end up one of the last mainframe systems programmers left alive.

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September 16, 2010 at 8:29 am, Richard Strozewski said:

It is about time. I thought I might end up one of the last mainframe systems programmers left alive.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 8:31 am, Balty Morales said:

Having had memorable experience in IBM Mainframes as well as DEC VAX/VMS, it makes me feel good that the old irons are still around. The
training offers for $350 by IBM is well worth the cost.
Good old COBOL, FORTRAN, MVS, VMS, has long
been eulogized, but alas still roams the corridors
of major companies who realizes that many basic work processes are still best done on mainframes.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 8:31 am, Balty Morales said:

Having had memorable experience in IBM Mainframes as well as DEC VAX/VMS, it makes me feel good that the old irons are still around. The
training offers for $350 by IBM is well worth the cost.
Good old COBOL, FORTRAN, MVS, VMS, has long
been eulogized, but alas still roams the corridors
of major companies who realizes that many basic work processes are still best done on mainframes.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 8:42 am, Ann said:

Where are these jobs? I have these skills, but can’t find a job.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 8:42 am, Ann said:

Where are these jobs? I have these skills, but can’t find a job.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 8:52 am, Linh Nguyen said:

How do I go about getting into this program?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 8:52 am, Linh Nguyen said:

How do I go about getting into this program?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:04 am, Charles Breslin said:

I want to register for the IBM System Z e-learning program.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:04 am, Charles Breslin said:

I want to register for the IBM System Z e-learning program.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:05 am, Larry said:

Where can I get this training?
And what can I expect to earn per hour/day/year?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:05 am, Larry said:

Where can I get this training?
And what can I expect to earn per hour/day/year?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:05 am, Gary Eisele said:

I remember working in an IBM mainframe environment. The company I worked for (IGIC) from 1984 – 1997 had 2 IBM 360/165 systems. I was involved in customer service and microfiche. I wouldn’t mind going back to that, if anyone could use someone with my background. I am not a techie (never was) but did manual software online & offline testing of reports and teller terminals. A company that could use my 13 years of expertise – please contact me at gbe281@yahoo.com. Thank you.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:05 am, Gary Eisele said:

I remember working in an IBM mainframe environment. The company I worked for (IGIC) from 1984 – 1997 had 2 IBM 360/165 systems. I was involved in customer service and microfiche. I wouldn’t mind going back to that, if anyone could use someone with my background. I am not a techie (never was) but did manual software online & offline testing of reports and teller terminals. A company that could use my 13 years of expertise – please contact me at gbe281@yahoo.com. Thank you.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:07 am, mike webb said:

Can’t find the link to those courses for $350 at IBM. Would’ve been nice to put it in the article.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:07 am, mike webb said:

Can’t find the link to those courses for $350 at IBM. Would’ve been nice to put it in the article.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:08 am, Dave G said:

This is BS. I have 26 years on IBM Mainframes and other mainframes with Cobol programming and because I don’t have CICS and or DB2 and can’t afford the classes and/or have been out of IT for over 2 years – they don’t even look at you. All my resumes and applications never get responded to. I was a MIS Manager, Systems Analyst and Project Leader.

This seems like just another scam to buy a product that will not pay off.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:08 am, Dave G said:

This is BS. I have 26 years on IBM Mainframes and other mainframes with Cobol programming and because I don’t have CICS and or DB2 and can’t afford the classes and/or have been out of IT for over 2 years – they don’t even look at you. All my resumes and applications never get responded to. I was a MIS Manager, Systems Analyst and Project Leader.

This seems like just another scam to buy a product that will not pay off.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:10 am, willie reaves said:

All of this sounds nice, but how does a mainframe applications developer with over 20 years’ experience and some training and knowledge of newer technologies such as ASP.NET, Java and SQL Server 2008 development but out of the field for seen years, return to it?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:10 am, willie reaves said:

All of this sounds nice, but how does a mainframe applications developer with over 20 years’ experience and some training and knowledge of newer technologies such as ASP.NET, Java and SQL Server 2008 development but out of the field for seen years, return to it?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:11 am, Jack McKenzie said:

So who do I call to get this training started?. I’m a COBOL programmer of many years but don’t have any System Z experience!

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:11 am, Jack McKenzie said:

So who do I call to get this training started?. I’m a COBOL programmer of many years but don’t have any System Z experience!

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:14 am, Patrick said:

Where is a link to the info about the IBM e-learning program ?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:14 am, Patrick said:

Where is a link to the info about the IBM e-learning program ?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:19 am, Carmen said:

Where are these mainframe jobs and do they hire entry level positions? I want to get back to mainframe programming but have been out of the field for several years.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:19 am, Carmen said:

Where are these mainframe jobs and do they hire entry level positions? I want to get back to mainframe programming but have been out of the field for several years.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:22 am, Morrice Turner said:

I worked on the IBM AS400 for over 10 years, when the company I worked for closed early last year.

How do you get access to the IBM Training mentioned in this article ?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:22 am, Morrice Turner said:

I worked on the IBM AS400 for over 10 years, when the company I worked for closed early last year.

How do you get access to the IBM Training mentioned in this article ?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:24 am, Caesar Lawrence said:

My Fellow Mainframers! I hear and feel your pain and shame. Yes, pain and shame. I have 20+ years of Mainframe, Client/Server and Operations Analysts experience and have not found a job in over 4 years. Recruiters give all kinds of excuses why I am not getting an interview. I have managed IT Projects and trained junior programmers. Built my own Small Business website. Yet, I can not get an interview.
“We have selected another candidate. Good luck in your job search.” It’s not right…

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:24 am, Caesar Lawrence said:

My Fellow Mainframers! I hear and feel your pain and shame. Yes, pain and shame. I have 20+ years of Mainframe, Client/Server and Operations Analysts experience and have not found a job in over 4 years. Recruiters give all kinds of excuses why I am not getting an interview. I have managed IT Projects and trained junior programmers. Built my own Small Business website. Yet, I can not get an interview.
“We have selected another candidate. Good luck in your job search.” It’s not right…

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:32 am, Usman Ibrahim Olalekan said:

I am highly interested. Pls send my invitation and how i can easily register for this training.

My location is Lagos Nigeria.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:32 am, Usman Ibrahim Olalekan said:

I am highly interested. Pls send my invitation and how i can easily register for this training.

My location is Lagos Nigeria.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:35 am, anil mehra said:

I am an IT consultant with experience in IBM and Unisys mainframes in my past life doing Database/File systems and 4gl languages development, design and support related environment for batch and real time apps. Lately I have worked with Client Server databases in n-tier environments doing ETL, BI reporting and Back end database on Oracle, SQL Server, Teradata etc.
If you know if a specific position for mainframe related job, please forward it to me as I am looking for work for some time now.
Thanks.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:35 am, anil mehra said:

I am an IT consultant with experience in IBM and Unisys mainframes in my past life doing Database/File systems and 4gl languages development, design and support related environment for batch and real time apps. Lately I have worked with Client Server databases in n-tier environments doing ETL, BI reporting and Back end database on Oracle, SQL Server, Teradata etc.
If you know if a specific position for mainframe related job, please forward it to me as I am looking for work for some time now.
Thanks.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:36 am, Randy said:

So how can I use this information to get a job working on mainframe computers? Are there companies will to hire me and send me to school to learn?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:36 am, Randy said:

So how can I use this information to get a job working on mainframe computers? Are there companies will to hire me and send me to school to learn?

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:37 am, Narayan Duwal said:

Do you have detail info about this IBM Mainframe training. I was not able to find online.

thanks

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:37 am, Narayan Duwal said:

Do you have detail info about this IBM Mainframe training. I was not able to find online.

thanks

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:41 am, Jim Anderson said:

re: Opportunities Supporting IBM’s Mainframes. Yes, Mainframes
Well I sure hope they are paying Mainframe people more than $30.00 an hour (that I saw advertised on Dice not so long ago). A postman or a mail clerk makes $40.00 an hour & doesn’t have to do major learning of all (new) IT constantly.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:41 am, Jim Anderson said:

re: Opportunities Supporting IBM’s Mainframes. Yes, Mainframes
Well I sure hope they are paying Mainframe people more than $30.00 an hour (that I saw advertised on Dice not so long ago). A postman or a mail clerk makes $40.00 an hour & doesn’t have to do major learning of all (new) IT constantly.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:46 am, Mark Feffer said:

Hi folks –

You’re right, we should’ve included more information on the training. We’re looking it up and will post is soon.

Thanks,

Mark

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:46 am, Mark Feffer said:

Hi folks –

You’re right, we should’ve included more information on the training. We’re looking it up and will post is soon.

Thanks,

Mark

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:48 am, Lloyd said:

It would have been nice if a link to the portal was provided.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:48 am, Lloyd said:

It would have been nice if a link to the portal was provided.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:49 am, shiva said:

Best Offer

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:49 am, shiva said:

Best Offer

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:49 am, joseph Kupferstein said:

I’m a 27 year main framer on wall st (age 57) worked at Broadcort/Merrill 16 1/2 years where would I find openings for mainfarme jobs in the securities industry.
do the head hunters have them ? which ?
also most jobs ask for interface to distributed platforms.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:49 am, joseph Kupferstein said:

I’m a 27 year main framer on wall st (age 57) worked at Broadcort/Merrill 16 1/2 years where would I find openings for mainfarme jobs in the securities industry.
do the head hunters have them ? which ?
also most jobs ask for interface to distributed platforms.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:53 am, Chuck MacIntyre said:

I’ve been saying this for years. I have over 20 years experience with IBM Mainframes, but HR personnel throw out my resume before it ever gets to the program managers desk.

If anyone can tell me how I get the information on the 5000 companies that still have mainframes, I could work for the next 10 years very comfortably, instead of fighting for the jobs that the kids and offshore programmers are competing for.

Chuck,
Denver, CO

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 9:53 am, Chuck MacIntyre said:

I’ve been saying this for years. I have over 20 years experience with IBM Mainframes, but HR personnel throw out my resume before it ever gets to the program managers desk.

If anyone can tell me how I get the information on the 5000 companies that still have mainframes, I could work for the next 10 years very comfortably, instead of fighting for the jobs that the kids and offshore programmers are competing for.

Chuck,
Denver, CO

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:08 am, Dino said:

Sorry guys. I should have included a link to the training. You’ll find it here.
http://www-304.ibm.com/jct03001c/services/learning/ites.wss/us/en?pageType=page&c=V422430P00140S49

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:08 am, Dino said:

Sorry guys. I should have included a link to the training. You’ll find it here.
http://www-304.ibm.com/jct03001c/services/learning/ites.wss/us/en?pageType=page&c=V422430P00140S49

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:25 am, Bryan Thompson said:

I have to agree with the first comment (Anthony). After 30+ years working as a programmer/Analyst/DBA in the mainframe environment, I finally switched careers because I couldn’t even get a agent/recruiter to return a phone call. And those were for projects that were paying $20 -$25 hour in Stab-in-the-back, Iowa. The last time I got that kind of rate was back in 1981.

What’s even more ironic, is that I used to teach programming for IBM.

And to Dave (this is BS) comment. I have the same experience except that I am also an expert in CICS and DB2 (15+years), have worked for some of the largest mainframe users including IBM, Verizon, GM and Exxon and I still can’t get my foot in any door.

The sad truth is that there is a mis-conception among many that if you have ever worked on a mainframe, you are somehow tainted, out of date and can’t be revived or re-trained.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:25 am, Bryan Thompson said:

I have to agree with the first comment (Anthony). After 30+ years working as a programmer/Analyst/DBA in the mainframe environment, I finally switched careers because I couldn’t even get a agent/recruiter to return a phone call. And those were for projects that were paying $20 -$25 hour in Stab-in-the-back, Iowa. The last time I got that kind of rate was back in 1981.

What’s even more ironic, is that I used to teach programming for IBM.

And to Dave (this is BS) comment. I have the same experience except that I am also an expert in CICS and DB2 (15+years), have worked for some of the largest mainframe users including IBM, Verizon, GM and Exxon and I still can’t get my foot in any door.

The sad truth is that there is a mis-conception among many that if you have ever worked on a mainframe, you are somehow tainted, out of date and can’t be revived or re-trained.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:38 am, Tammy Twitchell said:

I worked as a Storage Administrator/System Programmer. I also worked with CONTROL-M. I am like so many with this posting, I can’t find a job. I have tried to convert over to the server world but the young people of the world have taken over that. So it looks like a lot of training all over again. I don’t think I will go back to mainframes because it is so hard to convert to other jobs.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:38 am, Tammy Twitchell said:

I worked as a Storage Administrator/System Programmer. I also worked with CONTROL-M. I am like so many with this posting, I can’t find a job. I have tried to convert over to the server world but the young people of the world have taken over that. So it looks like a lot of training all over again. I don’t think I will go back to mainframes because it is so hard to convert to other jobs.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:40 am, Bob K. said:

There may be 5,000 companies still using MFs, but most if not all of the jobs are offshore!!

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:40 am, Bob K. said:

There may be 5,000 companies still using MFs, but most if not all of the jobs are offshore!!

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:44 am, Mike Cote' said:

I went to college to be a programmer…learned Cobol, RPG, Fortran…and learned on a IBM Sys 34 then realized I was much more suited to be an Operator and worked on AS400 for almost 4 yrs. I’m looking to return to an Operator type position but being out of it for several years..noone will even consider hiring me…Not to mention that the jobs seem to be few and far between. I’m not so sure there’s chance for a “revival”.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:44 am, Mike Cote' said:

I went to college to be a programmer…learned Cobol, RPG, Fortran…and learned on a IBM Sys 34 then realized I was much more suited to be an Operator and worked on AS400 for almost 4 yrs. I’m looking to return to an Operator type position but being out of it for several years..noone will even consider hiring me…Not to mention that the jobs seem to be few and far between. I’m not so sure there’s chance for a “revival”.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:45 am, Larry Fry said:

My assumption is that these MF jobs will get outsourced to cheap labor sights overseas as soon as the domestic job holders retire or move on. I’m sure that the training programs are already in place at these cheap labor sights to pick up the MF slack as soon as it becomes available (i.e., “The early bird gets the worm”, etc).

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:45 am, Larry Fry said:

My assumption is that these MF jobs will get outsourced to cheap labor sights overseas as soon as the domestic job holders retire or move on. I’m sure that the training programs are already in place at these cheap labor sights to pick up the MF slack as soon as it becomes available (i.e., “The early bird gets the worm”, etc).

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:49 am, Alton Moore said:

I’m another like Dave G, but also with VAX/VMS experience. The only “mainframe” jobs I’ve seen require travel. They think that if you haven’t used DB2, then you can’t possibly know SQL. I almost regret being in the computer field, since good employees are basically regarded as irritating commodities. We, the capable, are lucky to be hired… by the clueless, to do the mundane. I don’t even know if it’s still Microsoft’s fault at this point!

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:49 am, Alton Moore said:

I’m another like Dave G, but also with VAX/VMS experience. The only “mainframe” jobs I’ve seen require travel. They think that if you haven’t used DB2, then you can’t possibly know SQL. I almost regret being in the computer field, since good employees are basically regarded as irritating commodities. We, the capable, are lucky to be hired… by the clueless, to do the mundane. I don’t even know if it’s still Microsoft’s fault at this point!

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:58 am, Craig L. said:

I am a senior level IT executive and started my career with IBM mainframes. The distinction I want to make is that the older mainframes are classified as the 360/370s, the 43xxs and the 3090s type systems. The SYS 3/36/38s, PC36, then the newer AS400/iseries/system i are classified as midrange systems. There are more companies running the iseries/system i systems I believe, then the older systems. Companies sometimes list their apps/tools or hardware in job postings or just use a general IBM term ‘mainframe’. You need to dig a little. Some of the not so obvious companies support apps on iseries. For example, Oracle acquired JD Edwards, Hyperion and PeopleSoft (iseries ERP, financial and CRM apps) that they mentioned will continue to support. A tip is to created a personal database that cross references company names to company activity to development tools to apps and to keep it updated due to mergers and acquisitions. Companies like Hoovers or your vendors can provide a lot of information to you regarding company profiles just by talking with them.
Based on recent IBM announcements and offerings the life of the system i has been extended. Which allows for software vendors and companies to continue to invest into these platforms. Also great to hear that it extends to the mainframe world.
Cel

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 10:58 am, Craig L. said:

I am a senior level IT executive and started my career with IBM mainframes. The distinction I want to make is that the older mainframes are classified as the 360/370s, the 43xxs and the 3090s type systems. The SYS 3/36/38s, PC36, then the newer AS400/iseries/system i are classified as midrange systems. There are more companies running the iseries/system i systems I believe, then the older systems. Companies sometimes list their apps/tools or hardware in job postings or just use a general IBM term ‘mainframe’. You need to dig a little. Some of the not so obvious companies support apps on iseries. For example, Oracle acquired JD Edwards, Hyperion and PeopleSoft (iseries ERP, financial and CRM apps) that they mentioned will continue to support. A tip is to created a personal database that cross references company names to company activity to development tools to apps and to keep it updated due to mergers and acquisitions. Companies like Hoovers or your vendors can provide a lot of information to you regarding company profiles just by talking with them.
Based on recent IBM announcements and offerings the life of the system i has been extended. Which allows for software vendors and companies to continue to invest into these platforms. Also great to hear that it extends to the mainframe world.
Cel

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:03 am, In Phoenix said:

In Phoenix the mainframe jobs are ONLY for new college grads. I’m 40 & can’t even apply!

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:03 am, In Phoenix said:

In Phoenix the mainframe jobs are ONLY for new college grads. I’m 40 & can’t even apply!

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:04 am, Ken said:

Abysmal is an apt description of the IBM mainframe job market. I was laid off in 2003 and there was nothing. I re-tooled then. It’s been so long, I don’t want to go back. (>55 & <60)

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:04 am, Ken said:

Abysmal is an apt description of the IBM mainframe job market. I was laid off in 2003 and there was nothing. I re-tooled then. It’s been so long, I don’t want to go back. (>55 & <60)

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:14 am, Dino said:

Chuck Wrote:

I’ve been saying this for years. I have over 20 years experience with IBM Mainframes, but HR personnel throw out my resume before it ever gets to the
program managers desk.

If anyone can tell me how I get the information on the 5000 companies that still have mainframes, I could work for the next 10 years very comfortably,
instead of fighting for the jobs that the kids and offshore programmers are competing for.

Chuck,
Denver, CO
___________
Thank you, Chuck. That sounds like an excellent follow up article to this one. Check back to Dice in the next few days for more on this story. In the meantime, please search the jobs on Dice.com.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:14 am, Dino said:

Chuck Wrote:

I’ve been saying this for years. I have over 20 years experience with IBM Mainframes, but HR personnel throw out my resume before it ever gets to the
program managers desk.

If anyone can tell me how I get the information on the 5000 companies that still have mainframes, I could work for the next 10 years very comfortably,
instead of fighting for the jobs that the kids and offshore programmers are competing for.

Chuck,
Denver, CO
___________
Thank you, Chuck. That sounds like an excellent follow up article to this one. Check back to Dice in the next few days for more on this story. In the meantime, please search the jobs on Dice.com.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:20 am, Owen Forrest said:

I also cut my teeth on IBM and VAX/VMS systems. Unfortunately I have not seen any positions advertised in any of the job search web sites. It is interesting that our government is creating jobs and opportunities for our blue collar workers, but they are forgetting about all of the white collar workers who are left unemployed or under-employed. Our government has not come to realize 50% of the unemployed (from cnbc report) are white collar workers and competing for the same entry positions now as our college graduates. I would happily spend $350 for sharping up my mainframe skills if there was an opportunity at the end of the training.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:20 am, Owen Forrest said:

I also cut my teeth on IBM and VAX/VMS systems. Unfortunately I have not seen any positions advertised in any of the job search web sites. It is interesting that our government is creating jobs and opportunities for our blue collar workers, but they are forgetting about all of the white collar workers who are left unemployed or under-employed. Our government has not come to realize 50% of the unemployed (from cnbc report) are white collar workers and competing for the same entry positions now as our college graduates. I would happily spend $350 for sharping up my mainframe skills if there was an opportunity at the end of the training.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:39 am, always-looking-for-opportunity said:

Is this a joke or what?

Training should be free and job placement must be guaranteed by IBM after training to support those out of date, legacies systems.

Not in a million year that one should fall for this crap.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:39 am, always-looking-for-opportunity said:

Is this a joke or what?

Training should be free and job placement must be guaranteed by IBM after training to support those out of date, legacies systems.

Not in a million year that one should fall for this crap.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:45 am, Zseries TOP GUN said:

PLEASE show me WHERE these mainframe jobs are at Dice.com!!!! I am IBM Zseries,Pseries,DASD and TAPE trained by IBM as well I have training in Cobol. I worked at IBM for 12 years. I cant find a job with THOSE ‘vital’ skills.

Stop sending jobs oversees to India!!

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:45 am, Zseries TOP GUN said:

PLEASE show me WHERE these mainframe jobs are at Dice.com!!!! I am IBM Zseries,Pseries,DASD and TAPE trained by IBM as well I have training in Cobol. I worked at IBM for 12 years. I cant find a job with THOSE ‘vital’ skills.

Stop sending jobs oversees to India!!

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:54 am, winston Lawrence said:

Ok Dice – Strike one – Sensationalist ads masquerading as articles like this one and I’ll drop my “email” notifications from you guys.

This is pure and simple “BS”. Even at the peak you can’t compare the number of mainframe support folks to even Java coders its a pitiful fraction of a percent at best and when you add in C#, VB, Ruby, PHP (all of which can run on the mainframe without the developers knowing anything about mainframes) you may as well be touting the advantages of becoming a coal miner (which actually pays pretty well in comparison). Limit yourself to counting only Windows and UNIX sysadmins? The mainframe market needs are still only a tiny fraction at best.

I have mainframe experience myself (VTAM, SNA, VM) and have long since left that playground when IBM ITSELF PUSHED companies to OUTSOURCE to its own Global Services so now they are feeling the heat because the folks that left aren’t looking back at mainframes? Tough, except for a few specialized areas the mainframe is not cost-effective and for the real world it’s dead.

Reply

September 16, 2010 at 11:54 am, winston Lawrence said:

Ok Dice – Strike one – Sensationalist ads masquerading as articles like this one and I’ll drop my “email” notifications from you guys.

This is pure and simple “BS”. Even at the peak you can’t compare the number of mainframe support folks to even Java coders its a pitiful fraction of a percent at best and when you add in C#, VB, Ruby, PHP (all of which can run on the mainframe without the developers knowing anything about mainframes) you may as well be touting the advantages of becoming a coal miner (which actually pays pretty well in comparison). Limit yourself to counting only Windows and UNIX sysadmins? The mainframe market needs are still only a tiny fraction at best.

I have mainframe experience myself (VTAM, SNA, VM) and have long since left that playground when IBM ITSELF PUSHED companies to OUTSOURCE to its own Global Services so now they are feeling the heat because the folks that left aren’t looking back at mainframes? Tough, except for a few specialized areas the mainframe is not cost-effective and for the real world it’s dead.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 2:08 am, Michael Brewer said:

There is an embedded link in the article, just click and there is the offer.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 2:08 am, Michael Brewer said:

There is an embedded link in the article, just click and there is the offer.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 2:14 am, Kathleen said:

Are you sure? I have been looking for 30 months now (mostly mainframe) development work. For over 30 years; I had a great deal of success working on various business applications, but my latest encounter, the banks…never thought I would be out work for so long., to make up all that I have lost $ if ‘IF’ I find another job I have long way to go to recover my saving & retirement funds. (I am not the only one)

This profession did not exist, When I was growing up.

In the mean time I would NOT advise the young to go into Mainframe, a repeat, but rather blaze their own path.

Thank you.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 2:14 am, Kathleen said:

Are you sure? I have been looking for 30 months now (mostly mainframe) development work. For over 30 years; I had a great deal of success working on various business applications, but my latest encounter, the banks…never thought I would be out work for so long., to make up all that I have lost $ if ‘IF’ I find another job I have long way to go to recover my saving & retirement funds. (I am not the only one)

This profession did not exist, When I was growing up.

In the mean time I would NOT advise the young to go into Mainframe, a repeat, but rather blaze their own path.

Thank you.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 2:15 am, Ruth said:

I have 21 years analysis/design/programming experience on an AS400. Recently, I found myself looking for another position and they are not available where I am and even if I were willing to relocate, I can’t find AS400 jobs. I was a troubleshooter and problem solver. I programmed in COBOL & SQL, designed relational databases and designed applications as well as systems. All this experience doesn’t pay off, when everyone is going away from ‘green screen’ to web and you are not a web programmer. There maybe 10000 IBM mainframes somewhere, but there aren’t that many companies hiring for the type of career I had.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 2:15 am, Ruth said:

I have 21 years analysis/design/programming experience on an AS400. Recently, I found myself looking for another position and they are not available where I am and even if I were willing to relocate, I can’t find AS400 jobs. I was a troubleshooter and problem solver. I programmed in COBOL & SQL, designed relational databases and designed applications as well as systems. All this experience doesn’t pay off, when everyone is going away from ‘green screen’ to web and you are not a web programmer. There maybe 10000 IBM mainframes somewhere, but there aren’t that many companies hiring for the type of career I had.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 3:26 am, Todd-sama said:

I laugh as IBM is selling their training for mainframe for a cheap rate and the article implies that this is a great field to get into. I can tell you that at IBM, they love hiring contractors for VERY low pay and constant unpaid furloughs. The IBMers have just recently had all of their incentive pay removed (12-hour shift pay; night shift differential) . So, even if you spend $350 for some training, don’t look to IBM for a job unless you don’t mind being overworked, underpaid, under the constant threat of your job being outsourced, and the hideous “GDF” concept where your job is not as important as the metrics of what you are doing through the course of your day.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 3:26 am, Todd-sama said:

I laugh as IBM is selling their training for mainframe for a cheap rate and the article implies that this is a great field to get into. I can tell you that at IBM, they love hiring contractors for VERY low pay and constant unpaid furloughs. The IBMers have just recently had all of their incentive pay removed (12-hour shift pay; night shift differential) . So, even if you spend $350 for some training, don’t look to IBM for a job unless you don’t mind being overworked, underpaid, under the constant threat of your job being outsourced, and the hideous “GDF” concept where your job is not as important as the metrics of what you are doing through the course of your day.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 4:33 am, Linda said:

It’s a difficult decision on whether or not to retool/upgrade your skills in IT. And this includes platforms other than IBM mainframe. Too many jobs have been off-shored. This bargain-priced online course could very well be a money-making gimmick on IBM’s part.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 4:33 am, Linda said:

It’s a difficult decision on whether or not to retool/upgrade your skills in IT. And this includes platforms other than IBM mainframe. Too many jobs have been off-shored. This bargain-priced online course could very well be a money-making gimmick on IBM’s part.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 4:59 am, George said:

Where are these jobs? in India or Ireland…
The companies are hiring cheaper labor outside US.
And they put on risk the daily and long term operation of the systems.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 4:59 am, George said:

Where are these jobs? in India or Ireland…
The companies are hiring cheaper labor outside US.
And they put on risk the daily and long term operation of the systems.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 5:38 am, Ash said:

Link to the IBM $350 discounted training.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 5:38 am, Ash said:

Link to the IBM $350 discounted training.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 6:52 am, HRCohen said:

In fact this begins to sound more like a fire sale from IBM. Perhaps they can’t move the products at any higher prices.

I also began in the mainframe and minicomputer arenas using COBOL’ s and ISAM’s over various denominations. And some real DBMS’s too.

I was out of work over the last two years and I am now going on the road to help handle FDIC prompted bank closings, mergers and acquisitions. If you are a reasonable candidate to acquire Confidential / Public Trust clearance, talk to federal contractors / subcontractors and check out openings in various government organizations (Defense Finance and Accounting Services) for one. Strong fundamentals in Oracle or SQL Server will help.

Reply

September 17, 2010 at 6:52 am, HRCohen said:

In fact this begins to sound more like a fire sale from IBM. Perhaps they can’t move the products at any higher prices.

I also began in the mainframe and minicomputer arenas using COBOL’ s and ISAM’s over various denominations. And some real DBMS’s too.

I was out of work over the last two years and I am now going on the road to help handle FDIC prompted bank closings, mergers and acquisitions. If you are a reasonable candidate to acquire Confidential / Public Trust clearance, talk to federal contractors / subcontractors and check out openings in various government organizations (Defense Finance and Accounting Services) for one. Strong fundamentals in Oracle or SQL Server will help.

Reply

September 18, 2010 at 2:35 am, david menis said:

Yes. I have over 20 years of experience working in AS400 (iSeries) environment, programming in COBOL and so far, I would say, that re-training to Mainframe environment is the best possibility to survive for a COBOL programmer.

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September 18, 2010 at 2:35 am, david menis said:

Yes. I have over 20 years of experience working in AS400 (iSeries) environment, programming in COBOL and so far, I would say, that re-training to Mainframe environment is the best possibility to survive for a COBOL programmer.

Reply

September 18, 2010 at 4:11 am, MFCoder said:

MFCoder Part 1..
All Jive and B.S., training, smaining! You can have all the training, college degrees, and
20+ years of MF work Experience under the sun. Once you’ve been out-of-work longer
than 12 mos, they say they want someone with “recent” experience (NOT recent
“Training”). OBTW, IBM Consulting is one of the biggest American Outsourcing firms in
India! This course is obviously some kind of online-bait-and-switch internet scam! If Big
Blue labels this course as “job training” or “job Re-training”, they will surely get a nice fat
“Tax Break or Training Grant $$” from the well-meaning Feds. This fake training will not
stimulate anything but IBM’s bottom line, and their executive bonuses! … Continued …

Reply

September 18, 2010 at 4:11 am, MFCoder said:

MFCoder Part 1..
All Jive and B.S., training, smaining! You can have all the training, college degrees, and
20+ years of MF work Experience under the sun. Once you’ve been out-of-work longer
than 12 mos, they say they want someone with “recent” experience (NOT recent
“Training”). OBTW, IBM Consulting is one of the biggest American Outsourcing firms in
India! This course is obviously some kind of online-bait-and-switch internet scam! If Big
Blue labels this course as “job training” or “job Re-training”, they will surely get a nice fat
“Tax Break or Training Grant $$” from the well-meaning Feds. This fake training will not
stimulate anything but IBM’s bottom line, and their executive bonuses! … Continued …

Reply

September 18, 2010 at 4:14 am, MFCoder said:

MFCoder Part 2..
IBM & Dino should stop pulling our chains like this! If they were REAL, they would be
listing job openings by state or by zip code, so that already-trained, and Interview-Ready
Candidates like me and my 2 MF buddies in Chicago, could send our Interview-Ready
resumes. You guys should put-up or shut-up, we are all adults here, we don’t believe in Santa Claus, The Tooth Fairy, or IBM-MF training courses on-the-cheap! We live in the
real world. If IBM is so-o sweet, why aren’t they hiring MF people, training them as needed, and then placing them with these 5000 Ghost Firms (IBM consultants & clients),
who supposedly have these 10,000 Ghost Openings? It would be a win-win-win for all
concerned — if it wasn’t all fantasy I mean! … Continued …

Reply

September 18, 2010 at 4:14 am, MFCoder said:

MFCoder Part 2..
IBM & Dino should stop pulling our chains like this! If they were REAL, they would be
listing job openings by state or by zip code, so that already-trained, and Interview-Ready
Candidates like me and my 2 MF buddies in Chicago, could send our Interview-Ready
resumes. You guys should put-up or shut-up, we are all adults here, we don’t believe in Santa Claus, The Tooth Fairy, or IBM-MF training courses on-the-cheap! We live in the
real world. If IBM is so-o sweet, why aren’t they hiring MF people, training them as needed, and then placing them with these 5000 Ghost Firms (IBM consultants & clients),
who supposedly have these 10,000 Ghost Openings? It would be a win-win-win for all
concerned — if it wasn’t all fantasy I mean! … Continued …

Reply

September 18, 2010 at 4:16 am, MFCoder said:

MFCoder Part 3..
If any nugget of this fantasy were true, wouldn’t it be on the front page of InformationWeek, ComputerWorld, Datamation, or even Wired??? How many blogs would have it on their Banner Pages? Wouldn’t Monster and HotJobs be emailing all of us with the word “Mainframe” on our resumes? Is this information, on a need-to-know basis? Why has nobody else heard about this but Dino?? How many graduates of the training is IBM going to “place” (if they need them so-o bad, right?)? I know, don’t tell me: ZERO! Gimme-a-break, will ya. Its just another useless Training Certificate that Nobody cares about, but the people selling it. .. The End ..

Reply

September 18, 2010 at 4:16 am, MFCoder said:

MFCoder Part 3..
If any nugget of this fantasy were true, wouldn’t it be on the front page of InformationWeek, ComputerWorld, Datamation, or even Wired??? How many blogs would have it on their Banner Pages? Wouldn’t Monster and HotJobs be emailing all of us with the word “Mainframe” on our resumes? Is this information, on a need-to-know basis? Why has nobody else heard about this but Dino?? How many graduates of the training is IBM going to “place” (if they need them so-o bad, right?)? I know, don’t tell me: ZERO! Gimme-a-break, will ya. Its just another useless Training Certificate that Nobody cares about, but the people selling it. .. The End ..

Reply

September 18, 2010 at 7:25 am, CJ Chartrand said:

I learned my skills by the seat of my pants in the MF industry back in 1984. I’ve seen OS, XA, MVS, MVS/ESA, and z0s. I have good JCL skills, and production support skills CA7/11. I have operated some of these MF’s on my own. I’ve trained operators. It was fun, hard, and tiring. It provided a good life. I like many of you have not had any offers. I can count on one hand the MF’s remaining in my region in private industry and still have a digit left. NYS still has them. NOBODY is hiring. I’ve tried to re-tool for the PC Pointless & Click World, but that world don’t seem to want me either. Be very leery of anyplace wanting to sell you tech courses. It is just a game. I would probably work for a little less as long as I can make my own hours. I could give the IT world 20hrs a week of my time, but the rest of my time I would like to run a different BIG Machine. A Brewery!

Reply

September 18, 2010 at 7:25 am, CJ Chartrand said:

I learned my skills by the seat of my pants in the MF industry back in 1984. I’ve seen OS, XA, MVS, MVS/ESA, and z0s. I have good JCL skills, and production support skills CA7/11. I have operated some of these MF’s on my own. I’ve trained operators. It was fun, hard, and tiring. It provided a good life. I like many of you have not had any offers. I can count on one hand the MF’s remaining in my region in private industry and still have a digit left. NYS still has them. NOBODY is hiring. I’ve tried to re-tool for the PC Pointless & Click World, but that world don’t seem to want me either. Be very leery of anyplace wanting to sell you tech courses. It is just a game. I would probably work for a little less as long as I can make my own hours. I could give the IT world 20hrs a week of my time, but the rest of my time I would like to run a different BIG Machine. A Brewery!

Reply

September 19, 2010 at 10:41 am, Benshaton said:

Looking at the title of the article, I thought I was reading it off “The Onion” at first. Worked with IBM Mainframes & Peripherals been there, done that for a quarter century ending five years ago at 51 when I was riffed by my employer before the branch was closed. I found out that those skills are non- transferable for getting hired at anything else, mainframe positions available were few and far between, and I was out of work for over a year busting my butt looking for almost anything, and that was when the economy was much better than it’s been the last two years.

I have no desire to relocate to Armonk, NY for the opportunity to work with mainframes again. I’m done with the industry, although I retain fond memories of how things were a long time ago when it was more fun and less stressful.

Reply

September 19, 2010 at 10:41 am, Benshaton said:

Looking at the title of the article, I thought I was reading it off “The Onion” at first. Worked with IBM Mainframes & Peripherals been there, done that for a quarter century ending five years ago at 51 when I was riffed by my employer before the branch was closed. I found out that those skills are non- transferable for getting hired at anything else, mainframe positions available were few and far between, and I was out of work for over a year busting my butt looking for almost anything, and that was when the economy was much better than it’s been the last two years.

I have no desire to relocate to Armonk, NY for the opportunity to work with mainframes again. I’m done with the industry, although I retain fond memories of how things were a long time ago when it was more fun and less stressful.

Reply

September 19, 2010 at 11:31 am, EliminatedByOffshored said:

Totally agreed with Anthony that even the support for the mainframes are in demand as current workforces are retiring, those jobs will in no time be outsourced to the offshore country like India as already the strategy of all American enterprises. For smaller companies, IBM’ id-ranges are being replaced by PC servers or other platforms due to the cost and lack of interest by IBM to keep them.

What future do we have? Those jobs we’ve been waiting for are forever gone. The excitement this post tries to bring will only benefit offshored workers, not American workers. New waives of foreign people will soon fill those slots brought over by the deals stricken by greedy interest groups and foreign consulting firms (mostly just running headcounts business). US government continues to issue H1Bx visa to new foreign workers claiming companies here are not able to recruite qualified domestic employees.

What are we then? A bunch of retarded?

Reply

September 19, 2010 at 11:31 am, EliminatedByOffshored said:

Totally agreed with Anthony that even the support for the mainframes are in demand as current workforces are retiring, those jobs will in no time be outsourced to the offshore country like India as already the strategy of all American enterprises. For smaller companies, IBM’ id-ranges are being replaced by PC servers or other platforms due to the cost and lack of interest by IBM to keep them.

What future do we have? Those jobs we’ve been waiting for are forever gone. The excitement this post tries to bring will only benefit offshored workers, not American workers. New waives of foreign people will soon fill those slots brought over by the deals stricken by greedy interest groups and foreign consulting firms (mostly just running headcounts business). US government continues to issue H1Bx visa to new foreign workers claiming companies here are not able to recruite qualified domestic employees.

What are we then? A bunch of retarded?

Reply

September 21, 2010 at 3:15 am, Jack Simmons said:

Every once in a while someone will write a story like this. The last time someone did, I tracked the people quoted in the article to find out where all these mainframe jobs were. Wouldn’t tell me the time of day.

Obviously, there are no mainframe jobs out there today.

What is an old mainframer to do today?

Get yourself a nice franchise and do that. Once everything settles down, you can think about the good old days.

It happened to the sail makers and steamboat pilots in the 19th century; now you can understand the anguish those people went through. Or the home spinners in England when spinning machines obsoleted them at the start of the industrial revolution.

Reply

September 21, 2010 at 3:15 am, Jack Simmons said:

Every once in a while someone will write a story like this. The last time someone did, I tracked the people quoted in the article to find out where all these mainframe jobs were. Wouldn’t tell me the time of day.

Obviously, there are no mainframe jobs out there today.

What is an old mainframer to do today?

Get yourself a nice franchise and do that. Once everything settles down, you can think about the good old days.

It happened to the sail makers and steamboat pilots in the 19th century; now you can understand the anguish those people went through. Or the home spinners in England when spinning machines obsoleted them at the start of the industrial revolution.

Reply

September 21, 2010 at 8:10 am, unemployed said:

Yep, no jobs for IT workers who are citizens.
Only ones they will hire if you have “all” the requirements they want.

Reply

September 21, 2010 at 8:10 am, unemployed said:

Yep, no jobs for IT workers who are citizens.
Only ones they will hire if you have “all” the requirements they want.

Reply

September 21, 2010 at 9:07 am, sclark said:

sadly all true by ‘EliminatedByOffshored’. IF anyone thinks that “they’re just being paranoid” check out

H1B Visa – H1B Jobs – Work in America – USA Work Permit – Green Card – H1 Visa – US Work Visa – job
http://www.h1base.com/

…. it’s an organized attack on the in-country IT workers.

yet no one here knows where all these mainframe jobs are.. curious..

Reply

September 21, 2010 at 9:07 am, sclark said:

sadly all true by ‘EliminatedByOffshored’. IF anyone thinks that “they’re just being paranoid” check out

H1B Visa – H1B Jobs – Work in America – USA Work Permit – Green Card – H1 Visa – US Work Visa – job
http://www.h1base.com/

…. it’s an organized attack on the in-country IT workers.

yet no one here knows where all these mainframe jobs are.. curious..

Reply

October 03, 2010 at 10:35 am, Mark said:

Are you all so gullible that you can’t see through the thin veil that this is nothing more than an advertisement for a training service. They can’t guarantee you a job after training, but they CAN take your money by dangling a carrot in front of you. From your own testimonies, you can see there are few opportunities available in mainframe support. It’s both a tragedy and a shame that American corporations ship our jobs overseas just to save their bottom (line), while an increasing (record?) number of skilled American professionals are unemployed or underemployed. They are just turning America into the next third-world (or maybe fourth-world?) country!

Reply

October 03, 2010 at 10:35 am, Mark said:

Are you all so gullible that you can’t see through the thin veil that this is nothing more than an advertisement for a training service. They can’t guarantee you a job after training, but they CAN take your money by dangling a carrot in front of you. From your own testimonies, you can see there are few opportunities available in mainframe support. It’s both a tragedy and a shame that American corporations ship our jobs overseas just to save their bottom (line), while an increasing (record?) number of skilled American professionals are unemployed or underemployed. They are just turning America into the next third-world (or maybe fourth-world?) country!

Reply

October 07, 2010 at 1:27 am, Dman said:

Oh I see it now! Send our children to war to clear the way for USA corporations to setup shop off shores then hire local workers (modern slave labor). Then make a deal with the local governments (dictators) to allow their citizens into the USA to work for much less than the USA citizens. So either way they win and we lose. Why do corporations need so much money that they could never spend?!

Reply

October 07, 2010 at 1:27 am, Dman said:

Oh I see it now! Send our children to war to clear the way for USA corporations to setup shop off shores then hire local workers (modern slave labor). Then make a deal with the local governments (dictators) to allow their citizens into the USA to work for much less than the USA citizens. So either way they win and we lose. Why do corporations need so much money that they could never spend?!

Reply

October 07, 2010 at 10:01 am, Joe Gagnon said:

I have written code in 10 different languages on the 10 different platforms: 1401, H1400, RCA301, H1200, H2200, B5500, Singer10, 1130, 360/30, 3090, and PC’s. Languages included Machine Code (Absolute), SPS, Fargo, FORTRAN (several versions), Assembler, AlGOL58/60, COBOL (10 different levels); RMCOBOL on a 386 is fun. Of all the operating systems that I have worked with, the Boroughs MCP was the best. Boroughs had dynamic resource allocation and multiprocessing ten years before IBM. Honeywell also had great hardware and software. I built 50 application systems in 20 different industries . Guess what — NOBODY CARES.

I spent the last 20 years trying to convince the healthcare industry to use EDI-based, integrated IA and expert systems in a tightly-coupled, ongoing, full-function, cradle-to-grave that likes all players and functions into one planned system infrastructure. There is major fraud, inefficiency, and waste in the healthcare industry. Until we fix the problems in the healthcare industry, we are not going to fix the problems in education and our economy. Guess what — NOBODY CARES.

Comments welcome.

Reply

October 07, 2010 at 10:01 am, Joe Gagnon said:

I have written code in 10 different languages on the 10 different platforms: 1401, H1400, RCA301, H1200, H2200, B5500, Singer10, 1130, 360/30, 3090, and PC’s. Languages included Machine Code (Absolute), SPS, Fargo, FORTRAN (several versions), Assembler, AlGOL58/60, COBOL (10 different levels); RMCOBOL on a 386 is fun. Of all the operating systems that I have worked with, the Boroughs MCP was the best. Boroughs had dynamic resource allocation and multiprocessing ten years before IBM. Honeywell also had great hardware and software. I built 50 application systems in 20 different industries . Guess what — NOBODY CARES.

I spent the last 20 years trying to convince the healthcare industry to use EDI-based, integrated IA and expert systems in a tightly-coupled, ongoing, full-function, cradle-to-grave that likes all players and functions into one planned system infrastructure. There is major fraud, inefficiency, and waste in the healthcare industry. Until we fix the problems in the healthcare industry, we are not going to fix the problems in education and our economy. Guess what — NOBODY CARES.

Comments welcome.

Reply

October 07, 2010 at 10:58 am, Dman said:

Why go to school (spend all your doe) in the USA and learn everything about the USA and it’s history (shady) all your life just to be replaced by a non US citizen (who maintains citizenship and loyalty to their own country)? All they want is our USA money for home improvements. Now I don’t mind sharing with the world but be loyal to all born (we fight wars for this country) USA citizens. Corporate GREED! What a sin!

Reply

October 07, 2010 at 10:58 am, Dman said:

Why go to school (spend all your doe) in the USA and learn everything about the USA and it’s history (shady) all your life just to be replaced by a non US citizen (who maintains citizenship and loyalty to their own country)? All they want is our USA money for home improvements. Now I don’t mind sharing with the world but be loyal to all born (we fight wars for this country) USA citizens. Corporate GREED! What a sin!

Reply

October 08, 2010 at 12:55 am, Ithappenedtome said:

Your kidding me right? I know for a fact that IBM took its mainframe ops and sent it to Brazil. They maintain very little here in the USA. I am a mainframe operator. I been out of work for over 2 years after being layed off from contact work too IBM. So I know who’s doing my job right now.. Brazil!

Reply

October 08, 2010 at 12:55 am, Ithappenedtome said:

Your kidding me right? I know for a fact that IBM took its mainframe ops and sent it to Brazil. They maintain very little here in the USA. I am a mainframe operator. I been out of work for over 2 years after being layed off from contact work too IBM. So I know who’s doing my job right now.. Brazil!

Reply

October 09, 2010 at 9:36 am, Allen Biron said:

I, like many others I see here have 20 + years of Mainframe expertise and have just lost my position at AT&T. I have been an application as well as Middle ware programmer and very proficient at both. There are Mainframe jobs around if one wants to travel to a foreign country such as India or the Philipines. Perhaps if I go there, I could get my old job back because that is where it went. At half the salary of course.

Reply

October 09, 2010 at 9:36 am, Allen Biron said:

I, like many others I see here have 20 + years of Mainframe expertise and have just lost my position at AT&T. I have been an application as well as Middle ware programmer and very proficient at both. There are Mainframe jobs around if one wants to travel to a foreign country such as India or the Philipines. Perhaps if I go there, I could get my old job back because that is where it went. At half the salary of course.

Reply

October 11, 2010 at 7:48 am, Donald Mazza said:

If you know of any good mainframe jobs, especially in the z/VM area, please inform.

Thank You,

Don M.

Reply

October 11, 2010 at 7:48 am, Donald Mazza said:

If you know of any good mainframe jobs, especially in the z/VM area, please inform.

Thank You,

Don M.

Reply

October 15, 2010 at 9:00 am, Steve Clark said:

I worked for 13 years apiece as mainframe operator/
programmer for manufacturing corp.(closed) and MA
state college(laid off/now Sun pc system). I have DG
mainframe experience(Business basic programs) and
Digital Alpha(previous Eclipse) mainframe with Cobol,Assemblar, and Focus experience. Both are out of business and all technology by merger/law cannot be used any more. I am a musuem pice now!
I started out at IBM(Aetna Insurance) for a year too.
I am pc technicain now thanks to schooling but had no chance at other mainframe jobs because all my methods of doing things aren’t IBM’s I’m told. We just had a different day and give me a week and be back with the best of them! Goodbye mainframes!?

Steve – bummer!

Reply

October 15, 2010 at 9:00 am, Steve Clark said:

I worked for 13 years apiece as mainframe operator/
programmer for manufacturing corp.(closed) and MA
state college(laid off/now Sun pc system). I have DG
mainframe experience(Business basic programs) and
Digital Alpha(previous Eclipse) mainframe with Cobol,Assemblar, and Focus experience. Both are out of business and all technology by merger/law cannot be used any more. I am a musuem pice now!
I started out at IBM(Aetna Insurance) for a year too.
I am pc technicain now thanks to schooling but had no chance at other mainframe jobs because all my methods of doing things aren’t IBM’s I’m told. We just had a different day and give me a week and be back with the best of them! Goodbye mainframes!?

Steve – bummer!

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